Two new solar power plants to be built in the Odesa Oblast

by Natalia Datskevych Ukraine.com staff
January 25, 2019
This article originally appeared in Kyiv Post

TIU Canada owns solar plant at Nikopol, which helps to reduce Ukraine’s carbon dioxide emissions by 12,738 tons annually. Photo by TIU Canada

An investment plan totaling 94 million euros includes plans to build five solar power plants in Ukraine.

Two new solar power projects, with a combined capacity of 32.4 megawatts, has been announced for the Odesa Oblast.

Engineering and design work for both new projects have already begun.TIU Canada, the company in charge of the projects, already has four other projects in Ukraine, including two in Odesa.

The first one, a 10.5 megawatt solar power plant, is already operating near the city of Nikopol in Dnipropetrovsk Oblast. It started producing electricity in February 2018 and has the distinction of being the first investment made by a Canadian company under the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement (CUFTA), began in August 2017. The Nikopol plan created dozens of highly skilled jobs in a remote, rural part of the country as well as raises revenue for the city budget. It also reduces the amount of carbon dioxide by 12,738 tons that would otherwise be emitted into the environment annually.

Another project – the Kalynivka solar station near Mykolaiv – is already under construction. It will cover 20.2 hectares and have a generating capacity of 13.5 megawatts.

An investment plan totaling 94 million euros includes plans to build five solar power plants in Ukraine.

Renewable projects, mainly solar and wind power plants, have sprung up rapidly in Ukraine since 2009, especially in the past few years due to Ukraine setting a one of the world’s highest green tariffs – the rate paid for electricity generated from renewable sources.

However, the share of renewables in Ukraine’s electricity generation mix still remains very low – a modest 1.92 percent of the total produced electricity in the country, or 1,841 million kilowatts, as of Sept.1, 2018, according to the Ukrainian Renewable Energy Association.