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  • UKRAINE: New Entry Visa Rules

    Got this from my lawyer and thought it could be interesting to somebody on the forum




    UKRAINE: New Entry Visa Rules

    On 1 June 2011 the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine adopted Resolution No. 567 “Rules for Issuing Visas for Entrance into and Transit through the Territory of Ukraine”, which introduced new rules for the issuance of Ukrainian entry visas and Ukrainian temporary residence permits. Ackermann, Goltsblat & Partners can assist you in applying the new rules to your specific needs and will tailor a solution for you to stay in Ukraine legally for the required period of time.

    The new Rules will enter into effect on 11 September 2011 and provide for only 3 types of entry visas to Ukraine:
    (a) transit (type B);
    (b) short-term (type C); and
    (c) long-term (type D).

    The transit visa (type B) is issued for one, two or multiple entries for up to 1 year for an individual’s transit or the transit of baggage or passengers by automotive transport, and allows for a stay in the
    territory of Ukraine for up to 5 days during each transit. Ackermann, Goltsblat & Partners can assist you in obtaining the right entry or transit visa to Ukraine.

    The short-term visa (type C) is issued for individuals who intend to stay in Ukraine for up to 90 days within 180 days from the date of first entry. This visa may be issued for one, two or multiple entries for the duration indicated in the application but not exceeding five years. This type of visa will be issued for all short term visit purposes, including tourist, private, business, and medical, based on an invitation letter or other document which substantiates the purpose of the visit of a foreign national into Ukraine. Family members of Ukrainian citizens or foreigners that have a temporary or permanent residence permit must submit documents proving their family connection (e.g., marriage certificate) instead of the official invitation letter. Ackermann, Goltsblat & Partners can advise you which documents are required for obtaining this type of visa for your specific purpose and assist in preparing the required documents for the Ukrainian consulate.

    The long-term visa (D) is issued to individuals entering Ukraine with the purpose staying for more than 90 days. Such visa is issued to individuals who are:

    (i) studying in Ukraine;
    (ii) working in Ukraine pursuant to a work permit;
    (iii) working at a representative office of a foreign company or a representative office or a branch of a foreign bank;
    (iv) working in diplomatic missions or consulates of foreign countries and international organizations and their representative offices, and their family members;
    (v) working in religious organizations, representative office, department or a branch of foreign NGOs or participating in international technical aid projects;
    (vi) working in Ukraine as foreign correspondents or representatives of a foreign mass media, and their family members;
    (vii) immigrating to Ukraine pursuant to an immigration permit or are reuniting with their family members who obtained refugee status in Ukraine; or
    (viii) participating in the Euro 2012 preparation.

    Ackermann, Goltsblat & Partners can advise you which documents are required for obtaining long-term visa (D) for your specific purpose and assist in preparing the required documents for the Ukrainian consulate.

    In addition to the foreigners working in Ukraine pursuant to a work permit, the temporary residence permit will now be issued to D-visa holders who are working in representative offices of foreign companies, foreign banks, foreign NGOs as well as those working in religious organisations and on international technical aid projects. Ackermann, Goltsblat & Partners can advise you which documents are required for permanent residency in Ukraine and assist in preparing the required documents.

    Other cases for issuance of long-term visa and temporary residence permit may be stipulated by the international agreements of Ukraine.

    The visa issuance will be subject to the following consular fees:

    • USD 85 for a single-entry visa;
    • USD 130 for a double-entry visa; and
    • USD 200 for a multi-entry visa.

    Visa application is considered within 15 calendar days. This term may be extended to 30 days in the case where a further investigation is required. The expedited issuance of a visa is possible at double consular fee rate. Ackermann, Goltsblat & Partners can advise you which documents are required for obtaining an entry visa to Ukraine and assist in preparing the required documents for the Ukrainian consulate. Ackermann, Goltsblat & Partners can also provide you legal assistance in respect of any other Ukrainian law issue that you may have or face in Ukraine.

  • #2
    Here's the Ukrainian version of this decision. EDIT; This link works but it is shown here pretty weird.

    НЎвини екЎнЎміки: НЎві Правила ЎфЎрмлення віз для в'їзду в Україну і транзитнЎгЎ прЎїзду через її теритЎрію

    Basicly everything stays the same as it is now for countrys that are visa free for 90 days. It seems to be a price increase for countrys that currently need visa's. So the USA, Canada the countries of the EU and others I'm sure still don't need visa's.


    Retirement sucks! You never get a day off!!!

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    • #3
      Help Regarding visa

      I have a few questions i will be grateful if you answer them.
      I am an Indian citizen married in Ukraine with a girl of Ukrainian nationality.I was there as a student when we got married.
      the course finished and i had to go back to my country for exams and family issues.
      Now i want to go back.
      What visa should i apply for so as i can extend my stay?
      I went to Ukrainian embassy in Delhi and they said i cant extend my visa and i will have to leave after 3 months.
      I am distressed and don’t know what to do.
      I want to be there without all the visa and other bull****.But the thing is that i am married for a year and 4 months years and still 8 months to go before i apply for a green card.
      going to Ukraine and coming back in 3 months don’t make scene.as i am applicable for short term visa(c) on the marriage basis, can i extend my stay there by any means possible, if yes how?
      Help me out here.What to do.

      Comment


      • #4
        There is a new law that comes close to helping you BUT it requires a 2 year marriage.

        Check with the guys at expat.ua they may know the recent stuff.


        Retirement sucks! You never get a day off!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Can i extend my stay if i got tourist visa on the marriage basis.?

          Comment


          • #6
            expat.ua not working

            Originally posted by AkMike View Post
            There is a new law that comes close to helping you BUT it requires a 2 year marriage.

            Check with the guys at expat.ua they may know the recent stuff.
            the site is not working, please provide with other link.

            Comment


            • #7
              Whoops try expatua.com.. I messed up.

              I'd seriously doubt that you'll be able to based on my limted knowledge. If you don't leave they might not ever let you back in. A friend had to move to Muldova for some time until he could get his sorted out.


              Retirement sucks! You never get a day off!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Can anyone help me with trying to work out the timeline of Ukraine tourists visa rules for EU (and if different, UK) citizens since 2004?

                I recall that in 2004 a tourist visa for UK citizens was required. Now no visa is required.

                When was the change? Did it apply to all EU citizens equally? Was there only one change or did the rules change more than once?

                Comment


                • #9
                  90 days in and 90 days out!

                  During the 5+ years I've been coming to Ukraine, as a British subject I have been subject to the 90 days stay rule. On one occasion I benefited from an unplanned fall when I injured my ankle and was unfit to travel. Consequently when I finally departed from Ukraine I had overstayed my 90 days and was told I would have to pay a fine. However, I had the trauma clinic doctor's report in my possession and when I presented it I was told to wait. I believe the border agency telephoned the doctor to check out the certificate was genuine. After a long wait I was told I could go without a fine. Fortunately, on that occasion I was travelling by road, but had I have been flying I would have undoubtedly missed my flight.

                  On another occasion I miscalculated my days count and on departure from Donetsk airport (before the war) to depart on a budget flight at 01:30 in the morning. The border guard informed me I had overstayed and marched me down to the bank to pay a fine. On yet another occasion departing from Borispol airport I had once again overstayed. I had important social engagements that I had wished to attend so I decided to take a chance. Once again I was escorted to the airport bank to pay the fine. A charming lady officer explained nicely to me that the law is the law and that I should obey it. I now plan my life using day counter stop/start software on my smartphone as I now tend to come and go at shorter intervals and keeping check of the maximum rolling of 90 days in a 180 day period isn't easy.

                  I have observed another Brit who eventually married his Ukrainian sweetheart after having document hunted from both the UK and within Ukraine to furnish all the necessary documents required to enact the marriage process. I have observed his frustration and pain. He is now embarking on a similar frustrating episode trying to get a residency visa resulting from the marriage. Having witnessed my sweetheart's traipsing around Ukraine government departments in endless queues to get her driving licence renewed and again going through the necessary registration as a "refugee" from Lugansk now living in Kiev, I have decided to give Ukraine government offices a wide berth.

                  I understand that as I get older my current transient lifestyle will become difficult but I live in hopes that the new drive by the Poshenko administration to shake off the Soviet yoke and bring Ukraine's administration closer to European standards, that future marriage/residency applications may become easier and faster without an extra sum of non official payment being required to lubricate the process.
                  Meanwhile myself and others must cope wit the 90 day rule:

                  https://ukraineuncovered.wordpress.c...soviet-legacy/
                  Last edited by Gotno Gizmo; 29th September 2015, 12:58. Reason: typo error

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                  • #10
                    I understand that the fine in only 900 hrn. Right?


                    Retirement sucks! You never get a day off!!!

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                    • #11
                      Ukraine visa overstay fine

                      Ak Mike, the last time I had to pay the fine (around two years+ ago) it was 850 UAH.

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                      • #12
                        Close enough! Thanks!

                        I may have to pay that for my wife when we head out..


                        Retirement sucks! You never get a day off!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I did find out that IF the fine is paid ahead of time at the local OVIR, it speeds things up at the airport on exit. Carry the receipt and show it to the customs guys instead of pleading then being sent to the bank/ payment window then scurrying back to the gate.


                          ++++++ NOTE +++++++

                          There are a few reports of people being banned from Ukraine for up to 5 years for overstaying the 90 day window.

                          Prepayment at the local OVIR seems to preclude that problem so far. Ten days of border hopping are over now that they're set up with the computers


                          Retirement sucks! You never get a day off!!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Can anyone tell me if there is a guest tax to be paid when you visit and stay with friends in Odessa , if so how is it paid and any idea how much , thanks Dorset Pete

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by dorset pete View Post
                              Can anyone tell me if there is a guest tax to be paid when you visit and stay with friends in Odessa , if so how is it paid and any idea how much , thanks Dorset Pete
                              I believe we haven't such tax for visitors. At least I didn't hear anything about.
                              Hotels pay tourism tax, but visitors don't deal with that.
                              Ukraine Provider

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