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Old 22nd March 2016, 07:18
Hannia Hannia is offline
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RADIO FREE EUROPE March 22, 2016
Trump Says U.S. 'Can't Afford' To Spend So Much On NATO

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said the United States should significantly cut spending on the NATO
military alliance.

"We certainly can't afford to do this anymore," the GOP frontrunner told the Washington Post on March 21.

"NATO is costing us a fortune, and yes, we're protecting Europe with NATO, but we're spending a lot of money."

The United States has long called on NATO allies to step up their spending on the alliance, which has been a lynchpin of U.S. foreign relations for nearly 70 years.

U.S. military spending accounted for 72 per cent of the NATO total last year. NATO countries have pledged to increase their spending to 2 percent of gross domestic product, but only five member states currently meet that target: Britain, Estonia, Greece, Poland, and the United States.

"We are paying disproportionately. It's too much and frankly it's a different world than it was when we originally conceived of the idea," Trump told CNN.

While pulling back from NATO, Trump has said he would work more closely with Russian President Vladimir Putin, whose military intervention in Ukraine has increased tensions with NATO. Trump Says U.S. 'Can't Afford' To Spend So Much On NATO
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Old 22nd March 2016, 07:34
Hannia Hannia is offline
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A transcript of Donald Trump’s meeting with The Washington Post editorial board
THE WASHINGTOM POST Post Opinions Staff March 21 at 6:04 PM

FREDERICK RYAN JR., WASHINGTON POST PUBLISHER: Mr. Trump, welcome to the Washington Post. Thank you for making time to meet with our editorial board.

DONALD TRUMP: New building. Yes this is very nice. Good luck with it.

RYAN: Thank you… We’ve heard you’re going to be announcing your foreign policy team shortly… Any you can share with us?

TRUMP: Well, I hadn’t thought of doing it, but if you want I can give you some of the names… Walid Phares, who you probably know, PhD, adviser to the House of Representatives caucus, and counter-terrorism expert; Carter Page, PhD; George Papadopoulos, he’s an energy and oil consultant, excellent guy; the Honorable Joe Schmitz, [former] inspector general at the Department of Defense; [retired] Lt. Gen. Keith Kellogg; and I have quite a few more. But that’s a group of some of the people that we are dealing with. We have many other people in different aspects of what we do, but that’s a representative group.

FRED HIATT, WASHINGTON POST EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR: Do you want to start out?

TRUMP: No, other than to say, we’re working hard, I think we’re all in the same business of trying to make our country better, a better place, so we have something in common. I’ve been treated very, very badly by The Washington Post, but, you know, I guess — and I’m your neighbor, I’m your neighbor right down the road, in fact we’re actually giving a press conference there in a little while, I think your people are going to be there. And by the way, Bob Costa is an excellent reporter, I’ve found him to be just an excellent reporter. I should tell you, because I have to give you the good and the bad. Not that he does me any favors, because he doesn’t, but he’s a real professional.

So we’re having a news conference today in the new building that’s going up, and the building is very much ahead of schedule, because it was supposed to open two years from September, and we’re going to open it in September. We could open it actually sooner but we’re going to break it in a little bit, so we’re going to open it in September, and it’s under budget, even though we’ve increased the quality of the finishes substantially, marble finishes, very high quality of marble, so we’re under budget and ahead of schedule. And I’m, you know, I am that way when I build, I know how to build, I know how to get things done.

The GSA [General Services Administration], I will say, GSA has been very professional, they’ve been very, very professional. They chose us over—I think they had more than 100 people who bid, you can imagine, because of the location, but they had over 100 people that bid, and it was broken down into ten finalists, and I got it. We got it because of the strength of my financial statement and also because of the strength of what we were proposing. So we’re having a news conference there today. What time is that, Hope?

HOPE HICKS, TRUMP CAMPAIGN SPOKESPERSON: It’s at 2:15.

TRUMP: 2:15. I hear a lot of the press is going to be there, we’re going to give them a tour of the building. It’s still a little bit rough — as an example, a lot of the marble surfaces all have sheetrock covering, and plywood covering on them, so a lot of people won’t see as much as they think. It’ll be like a miracle, you take it off and it explodes, like it’s finished, right? But that’ll be a fun news conference.

HIATT: If I could, I’d start by asking is there a secretary of state and a secretary of defense in the modern era who you think have done a good job? Who do you think were the best?

TRUMP: Well, because I know so many of them, and because in many cases I like them, I hate to get totally involved. I think George Shultz was very good, I thought he was excellent. I can tell you, I think your last secretary of state and your current secretary of state have not done much. I think John Kerry’s deal with Iran is one of the worst things that I’ve ever seen negotiated of any kind. It’s just a horrible giveaway.

HIATT: What in particular?

TRUMP: Well, I think, number one, we shouldn’t have given the money back. I think, number two, we should have had our prisoners before the negotiations started. We should have doubled up the sanctions. We should have gone in and said, ‘release our prisoners,’ they would have said ‘no,’ and we would have said, ‘double up the sanctions,’ and within a short period of time we would have had our prisoners back. And I think that was a terrible mistake. I think giving the money back was a terrible mistake. And by the way they are not using the money on us, they are not buying anything from us, they’re buying, you noticed, they didn’t buy Boeing, they bought Airbus, 118 planes from what I understand, but they bought them all from Airbus, they go out of their way not to spend any money in our country. So I wouldn’t have done that. And I think it’s going to just lead, actually, to nuclear problems. I also think it’s going to be bad for Israel. It’s a very bad deal for Israel.

HIATT: George Shultz, it’s interesting, was associated with a foreign policy of Reagan that was very much devoted to promoting democracy and freedom overseas. Is that something you think in today’s world the United States should be doing?

TRUMP: I do think it’s a different world today and I don’t think we should be nation building anymore. I think it’s proven not to work. And we have a different country than we did then. You know we have 19 trillion dollars in debt. We’re sitting probably on a bubble and, you know, it’s a bubble that if it breaks is going to be very nasty. And I just think we have to rebuild our country. If you look at the infrastructure — I just landed at an airport where, not in good shape, not in good shape. If you go to Qatar and if you go to (inaudible) you see airports the likes of which you have never seen before. Dubai, different places in China. You see infrastructure, you see airports, other things, the likes of which you have never seen here.

HIATT: Short of nation building, is there any role in promoting values or democracy? Or that’s not something…

TRUMP: Well, there is, I just think that we have values in our country that we have to promote. We have a country that is in bad shape, it’s in bad condition. You look at our inner cities, our inner cities are a horrible mess. I watched Baltimore, I have many, many friends in Baltimore, we watched what happened. St. Louis, Ferguson, Oakland, it could have been much worse over the summer. And it will probably be worse this summer. But you look at some of our inner cities. And yet you know I watched as we built schools in Iraq and they’d be blown up. And we’d build another one and it would get blown up. And we would rebuild it three times. And yet we can’t build a school in Brooklyn. We have no money for education, because we can’t build in our own country. And at what point do you say hey, we have to take care of ourselves. So, you know, I know the outer world exists and I’ll be very cognizant of that but at the same time, our country is disintegrating, large sections of it, especially in the inner cities.

HIATT: So what would you do for Baltimore, let’s say.

TRUMP: Well, number one, I’d create economic zones. I’d create incentives for companies to move in. I’d work on spirit because the spirit is so low, it’s incredible, the unemployment, you look at unemployment for black youth in this country, African American youth, is 58-59 percent. It’s unthinkable. Unemployment for African Americans – not youth, but African Americans – is very high. And I would create in the inner cities, which is what I really do best, that’s why when I open a building and I show you it’s way ahead of schedule, under budget and everything else—I think it was the Rite Aid store, the store in Baltimore it took them 20 years to get it built, one store, and then it burned down in one night—we have to create incentives for people to love what they are doing, and to make money. And to create, you know, to really create a better life for themselves. And you can’t – it doesn’t seem right that you will have a situation like Baltimore, and many other places, let’s use Baltimore as an example, there are many Baltimores in this country. Detroit is maybe even a better example than Baltimore. But that you’ll have a situation like that, and then we’re over nation building with other, with countries that in many cases don’t want us there. They want our money, but they don’t want us.

continue reading interview https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...itorial-board/
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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 22nd March 2016, 18:27
Gotno Gizmo Gotno Gizmo is offline
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Americans, years behind the curve

Hannia,
I usually find most of the articles that you cut and post excessively wordy. Clearly American journalists are paid by the word rather than their real news worthiness. Perhaps that's why most Americans don't seem to know what's going on in the world because they lose interest after reading a few hundred words and lose interest.

Why do I believe that too many Americans are not up to speed about what is happening in their local world and beyond. In the later part of your last post, in the published interview of Donald Trump,he says the following:-

But it’s many millions of jobs, and it’s to countries all over. Mexico is really becoming the new China. And I have great issue with that. Because you know I use in speeches sometimes Ford or sometimes I use Carrier – it’s all the same: Ford, Carrier, Nabisco, so many of the companies — they’re moving to Mexico now. And you know we shouldn’t be allowing that to happen. And tremendous unemployment, tremendous. They’re allowing tremendous people that have worked for the companies for a long time, they’re allowing, if they want to move around and they want to work on incentives within the United States, that’s one thing, but when they take these companies out of the United States. Other countries are outsmarting us by giving them advantages, you know, like in the case of Mexico. In the case of many other countries. Like Ireland is, you’re losing Pfizer to Ireland, a great pharmaceutical company that with many, many jobs and it’s going to move to Ireland.

I wrote back in 2010 about the decline of the USA economy due to the deficit of trade with China because the USA was spending so many US Dollars there, and China was buying so little from the US in return. I also wrote extensively about major corporations outsourcing American jobs to cheap labor markets. I warned that American citizens were purchasing their own unemployment. I explained that by "multi-nationalizing" their business they could avoid many of the corporate profits that should have been due to the country in which the profits were generated. At this time I was ridiculed by AkMike and others by being told that I was living in cloud cuckoo land.

Today many of your countrymen are rallying to hear the great Donald Trump saying virtually everything I was writing long ago, and believing him to be the best Presidential potential for the future. If only I was a younger man I might suggest that these people should nominate me as potential candidate as I seem to be SIX YEARS ahead of Trump in my ability to identify the situation.
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Old 23rd March 2016, 06:22
Hannia Hannia is offline
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Is this a case of cultural cringe?

Quote:
I usually find most of the articles that you cut and post excessively wordy. Clearly American journalists are paid by the word rather than their real news worthiness. Perhaps that's why most Americans don't seem to know what's going on in the world because they lose interest after reading a few hundred words and lose interest.
There are appx 500+ readers who show up here on a daily basis, who would disagree w/you. I am a prolific reader and my variety of cut & paste posts are enjoyed by many. It saves them time and I receive many emails thanking me for that.

I myself prefer brevity and earnest writing. I hold no deference to what is imagined as a superior sense of wit and history.



Quote:
Today many of your countrymen are rallying to hear the great Donald Trump saying virtually everything I was writing long ago
The Republicans make up appx 28% of the American voting population. Trump has the support of the most extreme third of Republicans.

Your opinions certainly fit into the demographic favoring Trump: 50+ yr old angry white guys, displaced by the recession, w/little to no financial means.
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Last edited by Hannia; 23rd March 2016 at 06:39.
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Old 23rd March 2016, 08:26
Gotno Gizmo Gotno Gizmo is offline
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Response to Hannia

What about the thousands of YOUNG people who rally to Bernie Sanders who has perhaps a stronger anti-corporate greed narrative.

Regarding your "It saves them time and I receive many emails thanking me for that".
All that I have noticed now for many months in this forum is the recent posts page showing the daily input of Hania,Hania,Hania,and Hania with very little input from anybody else. How different this is from when I first came across this website more than six years ago when this forum was a hive of individuals challenging one another's opinion. On the few occasions I have taken time to write an opinion, probably because you may disagree with me, you have quickly buried my post under one or two of your long cut and paste jobs by a journalists telling us what we already know (or should know given that this site is devoted to Ukraine followers).

However, happily for me I have Twitter where I can vent my anti-Putin anger on his many sponsored pages countering his propaganda and distorted news headlines. But I still yearn for the many once regular contributors to this forum who are now absent. I have been less active here for more than one year now so believe it is not me that has driven them all away; could it be you I wonder?
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Old 23rd March 2016, 15:39
Hannia Hannia is offline
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GG, You do think too highly of yourself. Get over it.

Need I remind you that I did not participate in this forum for a number of yrs and the site was on the verge of being shut down for lack of traffic? Your stuffy blogs weren't doing it and all the biblical quotes by the russophile moderator weren't doing it as well. Like it or not, the Genealogy subforum was the traffic driver and still is.

BTW Twitter turned 10 years old Monday, but its stock seemingly gets younger after each earnings report. Last yr it took a nosedive of 50%. The question remains whether it can actually make it to 15?

Happy Twittering!
============
Quote:
What about the thousands of YOUNG people who rally to Bernie Sanders who has perhaps a stronger anti-corporate greed narrative.
Millennials were born post the Cold War & communism and have no sense what that means. They have no notion of where socialism can easily lead. They have grown up w/a sense of entitlement. They got medals for merely being in the race and not winning it. What is the surprise that they feel the bern and won't bother asking themselves who's paying for the trip?
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Last edited by Hannia; 24th March 2016 at 02:08.
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Old 23rd March 2016, 17:16
Hannia Hannia is offline
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America’s primaries - What now?
The Republican Party has run out of good options
Mar 19th 2016 THE ECONOMIST

THE primaries that took place on March 15th were meant to bring clarity to the race for the White House. Although they did not disappoint, neither did they reassure (see article). For the Republican Party, this is the moment when a driver realises that a crash is coming and it is too late to brake. Their opponents have, barring disaster, picked Hillary Clinton to be the Democratic nominee and she is now free to concentrate on the general election. Donald Trump, meanwhile, is likely to scrap and bluster his way to the nomination before the convention, or to go into it with a commanding lead.

For the party of Lincoln this is a disaster. Mr Trump is disliked so intensely by so many Americans that the damage to the party wrought by his nomination could go far beyond failing to win the White House, to hurting Republicans’ chances in House and Senate races. That is why the Republican establishment (or what is left of it) is frenziedly searching for ways, from a brokered convention to supporting a third-party conservative, to stop the man who has mesmerised their party. Unfortunately, there are no good options.

If Mr Trump accumulates the 1,237 delegates that he needs to command an absolute majority in the convention, he will have won fair and square. There will be much to mourn, but little responsible conservatives can do.

The complications begin if the Republicans find themselves in a contested convention. On paper, the rules are simple: on the first ballot, almost all delegates are supposed to observe the preference of the primaries or caucuses in their state. If that round is inconclusive, they can then vote as they choose.

In practice this is a recipe for a savage battle. Aware that his lead could go up in a puff of smoke as delegates desert him in a second round of voting, Mr Trump this week warned of riots if he is deprived of the nomination. Halfway between a prediction and a threat, Mr Trump’s words are one more reason he does not deserve the presidency.

But he is right that the taint of unfairness could poison the nomination. In a contested convention the delegates’ individual actions are central: they not only select the nominee, but they also vote freely on changes to the rules—which they can skew to favour their personal choice. So who picks the delegates? Rules differ from state to state, but the answer is, largely, the very establishment that electors have rejected. As if that weren’t complicated enough, the parties took steps in the 1960s to bind the conventions more closely to the results of the votes in primaries. Were the party to anoint anyone other than Mr Trump or the second-placed Ted Cruz, a divisive ideologue who is detested by his colleagues in the Senate, it would cause outrage. And rightly so.

The hard truth for the Republican Party (and thus, in a two-party system, for America) is that the lack of good options reflects a deep internal schism. The coalition between business, evangelicals, defence hawks and blue-collar voters has broken apart. The anger Mr Trump taps into is not unique to America: from France to Germany to America, between a fifth and a quarter of the electorate are tempted by populist parties. But in Europe that energy is channelled into seats in parliament and possible coalition governments. In America, the pipework narrows to a party’s nominee and then the presidency.

That raises the stakes and makes a resolution harder. The Republican orthodoxy has no answer to the anger of Mr Trump’s supporters. The challenge goes deeper than one man. Republicans have a long journey ahead to work out what sort of party they want.
What now? | The Economist
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