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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 15th October 2014, 14:56
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Hannia, Yes I did read your post wrong in the other thread. I apologize for that.
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Old 15th October 2014, 15:26
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Opposition Bloc demands president disarm and dissolve all militarized units having no official status
Oct. 15, 2014, 4:46 p.m. | Ukraine — by Interfax-Ukraine

The Opposition Bloc has demanded that the Ukrainian president disarm and dissolve all militarized units having no official status.
Opposition Bloc demands president disarm and dissolve all militarized units having no official status
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Old 15th October 2014, 15:45
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Pavlo Petrenko: Civic lustration council started its work
13.10.2014 Ukraine Crisis Media Center

Kyiv, 13 October 2014 – Starting from 13 October one could submit a request for participation in work of the Civic lustration council. The statement was made by Ukraine’s Minister of Justice Pavlo Petrenko and Head of Civic lustration committee of Ukraine Yegor Sobolev at a briefing in the Ukraine Crisis Media Center. “The Law “On Lustration” foresees that the lustration body has to be formed first of all of civic activists and journalists. Inform us on your goals and your professional achievements in combating corruption. We are announcing competition-based selection and are inviting all people who would like to become part of the Civic council. We are expecting strong journalists-investigators, civic activists who have impeccable and long-standing reputation, experience and achievements in combating corruption to form the supervisory council for lustration process and become the controlling body,” - noted Yegor Sobolev.

Key selection criteria for the candidates to enter the newly-created body will be “crystal reputation, long-standing experience of combating corruption, reputation proved by actions and commitment to have the lustration checks applied on himself.” Requests will be accepted within a week. “Civic lustration council will not be holding lustration on its own. It is going to function as a coordination body only. Lustration will be held by state authorities, they will be controlled by the Ministry of Justice. The main function of Civic lustration council – a civic body being created under the Ministry of Justice, being impartial and independent from the state apparatus to accept the claims and have them directed to respective bodies that are holding checks and to law enforcement. And the most important thing is to control neutrality and timeliness when such cases are being considered,” explained Minister Pavlo Petrenko.

The Law “On Lustration” was signed by the President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko on October 9th . The law foresees clear lustration procedure: to dismiss those civil servants who were on the highest posts in times of Yanukovych regime for over 1 year with no right to occupy any posts at state bodies within 10 years. “Both civil servants and civic activists who would like to control them have to be subject to lustration. Respective announcements will be placed on web sites of the Ministry of Justice and of the Civic lustration committee. It is no doubt that all volunteers will not be able to make part of the Civic council. I ask to take it with understanding as it has to be a working body. However all those who will not receive that special status have a much wider status of the citizen of Ukraine. I call on everyone to get involved in the checks without waiting for any special statuses,” said Yegor Sobolev at the briefing.
Pavlo Petrenko: Civic lustration council started its work | Ukraine Crisis Media Center | UACRISIS.ORG
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Old 16th October 2014, 14:58
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15:13 16.10.2014
Checks of officials under lustration law to start on November 1, says Ukrainian PM

Checks of senior officials and civil servants in accordance with the law on lustration will start on November 1, Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatseniuk has said.

"Then (after the dismissal of 39 high-ranking officials) the government will issue a decree to approve a plan of inspections in accordance with the law on lustration," he said opening a government meeting on Thursday.

"The prime minister, the first deputy prime minister, deputy prime ministers, ministers, heads of central executive agencies, which are not members of the Cabinet, the governor of the National Bank, the head of the CEC, members of the National Council on Television and Radio Broadcasting, chiefs of the Foreign Intelligence Service and the State Guard Department, the head of the presidential administration, the head of the Cabinet's secretariat, members of national commissions will be first to fall under the inspections which will start on November 1," Yatseniuk said. Checks of officials under lustration law to start on November 1, says Ukrainian PM
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Old 20th October 2014, 19:46
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A Lustration Law for the Record – and the Elections
20.10.14 | Halya Coynash

The farcical nature of Ukraine’s new Law on Cleaning up the Government [or lustration law] was demonstrated within hours of the law coming into force on Oct 16. A list of the first 36 heads to roll was made public with the full names and positions of each person given, including those who had already resigned because they didn’t want to fall under the law. It was all like a public executions – but of suspected witches rather than of known criminals. Each person on the list was deemed guilty by virtue of the post he or she had occupied.

The theory is that all those people, by holding their posts during the regime of former president Viktor Yanukovych are implicated in that administration’s undoubted corruption, plundering and repression. How true that is of, for example, the chief inspector of nuclear and radiation safety, can surely be disputed. The other problems are the number of people who have been conveniently left off the list, as well as those likely to be quietly ‘forgotten’ about and left untouched.

The draft law on lustration was adopted by parliament on Sept 16 without the text of the law having been made public. We can only hope that the MPs themselves knew what they were voting for and that it corresponded to the law finally revealed towards the end of September. The law has only now supposedly been sent for assessment to the Council of Europe’s Venice Commission. That body of legal experts is highly likely to slam the entire law, but after a large number of people have been named as falling under the law.

If it’s not quietly shelved after the elections

There can be no excuse for the demonstrations of mob rule in recent months where politicians have been thrown into rubbish containers. They do, however, indicate public frustration at the lack of progress in removing – or prosecuting – those seen as directly implicated in the crimes and corruption of the previous regime.

It is unfortunately likely that those now in power felt that they needed to come up with something, or risk the voters’ wrath at the elections in late October. It remains to be seen how the lustration process will continue once the elections are over.

Legal specialists and human rights organizations have long pointed out the major failings in the law. Yevhen Zakharov, head of the Kharkiv Human Rights Group, pointed to the quite excessive number of posts the law regards as subject to lustration. How can you possibly dismiss 95% of the managerial personnel of the law enforcement agencies? Who would you replace them with for a start?

Various high-ranking officials, including the Justice Minister Pavlo Petrenko, have suggested that relatively small numbers of officials will be dismissed. This may well be what ends up happening, yet if you read the law it covers a fairly large number of people, while leaving out all the MPs who, for example, voted for the anti-protest laws of Jan 16 2014. Nobody is suggesting that such MPs should bear anything other than moral liability for such actions. It is up to the voters to determine their future political career, however the fact that they would not be impeded from holding public office while the above-mentioned expert on nuclear safety is banned casts doubts about what this version of ’lustration’ will actually achieve.

The law as it stands covers only those in fairly senior positions under Yanukovych, or back in Soviet times. If they go for experience, therefore, in replacing staff dismissed, they will look to people who held similar positions under presidents Viktor Yushchenko or Leonid Kuchma. They do not fall under the law in question, but how ‘clean’ they are can probably be questioned. Or they will go for people with very little experience, probably also basing the choice on the candidates’ political opposition to the previous regime and / or communism.

The likeliest scenario is however highly selective lustration which, like selective justice, is a travesty of rule of law.

The law already makes some exceptions which can be questioned. It does not cover anybody elected to office. This may be justified with those elected by the public, via elections, but is not necessarily logical with respect to the Human Rights Ombudsperson who is elected by parliament. It also stipulates that a person must have held the position for at least one year during the relevant period. This does not necessarily make sense, but serves to remove any suggestion that the current President Petro Poroshenko would be subject to lustration given that he held a ministerial post under Yanukovych for nine months.

The next problem, of course, is that the law does not prevent people standing for election. The former head of the Security Service [SBU], Valery Khoroshkovsky is standing in a single mandate constituency. He can be elected, but would then be ineligible for ministerial posts, the top position in the SBU, etc. The current Ombudsperson Valeria Lutkovska was a deputy justice minister for the first two years of Yanukovych’s administration meaning that she does fall under the law, and yet her position now does not.

There are also people, such as the present head of the SBU Valentin Nalyvaichenko and current parliamentary speaker Oleksandr Turchynov who fall under the law as graduates of the KGB’s higher institute. There is widespread scepticism as to whether the letter of the law will be applied in their case.

There is no independent body overseeing the process. Instead decisions are taken by the Justice Ministry on the basis of checks carried out by the management of the government bodies where the specific person works. Zakharov suggests that this will be used as a method for getting rid of inconvenient employees.

At present, however, even the word ‘check’ is of extremely limited semantic value. Those dismissed thus far were chosen on the basis solely of the fact that their post is listed in the law. This is worlds apart from the lustration process that took place in other eastern European countries. In Poland, for example, people’s names were revealed only if they were found to have lied to the independent body about collaboration with the previous regime.

Under Ukraine’s law as it stands, certain people will be stripped of any right to privacy on the basis of the position they held, regardless of their own involvement. It will very likely soon become apparent that other people who should fall within the scope of the law are not touched.

to complete read: A Lustration Law for the Record and the Elections :: khpg.org
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Old 21st October 2014, 15:05
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Votes being bought for Hr 50 - Hr 500 - Ukrainian Voters Committee
Oct. 21, 2014, 4:54 p.m. | Ukraine — by Interfax-Ukraine

The number of cases of bribing voters at the 2014 early parliamentary elections in Ukraine is smaller than that at the 2012 elections, with the price for a vote ranging between Hr 50 and Hr 500, the Committee of Voters of Ukraine (CVU) has reported.
Votes being bought for Hr 50 - Hr 500 - Ukrainian Voters Committee
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Old 21st October 2014, 15:10
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Serhiy Klyuyev, brother of suspect in killings of EuroMaidan protesters, runs for parliament in Donetsk Oblast
Oct. 21, 2014, 4:21 p.m. | Politics — by Anastasia Forina

The Klyuyev brothers, Andriy and Serhiy, have been long-time allies of overthrown President Viktor Yanukovych.

Andriy Klyuyev, the former chief of staff for Yanukovych, is a suspect in organizing the mass killings during the EuroMaidan Revolution. He is also accused of stealing public assets. He is wanted by the Security Service of Ukraine. While his whereabouts are unknown, he is believed to be hiding out in Russia with Yanukovych and many other fugitive members of the disgraced administration.

His younger brother, Serhiy, is running for re-election to parliament in Donetsk Oblast. And he's doing fine, although he acknowledges the family has had a tough year.

“During the last year our family has really experienced difficult times. But we’ve become only stronger,” Serhiy Klyuyev said in an emailed response to the Kyiv Post. “I think sooner or later we will get to know all the truth about those events, including the names of those who have drawn Ukrainian people into military conflict. Regarding Andriy Petrovych (Klyuyev), he is deeply concerned about the situation in Ukraine, Donbas and in the district."

His constituency 46, which includes the city of Artemivsk, is one of 10 districts out of 21 in the war-torn oblast where elections are expected to happen.

Eight districts - 41, 42, 43, 44, 54, 55, 56, 61 - remain under the control of Kremlin-backed insurgents, while three - 45, 51, 53 - are considered problematic, head of Central Election Commission Mykhailo Okhendovsky announced on Oct. 17.

Multimillionaire Serhiy Klyuyev, 45, is a former Party of Regions lawmaker. He’s been member of parliament since 2006. Serhiy Klyuyev supported the Jan. 16 “dictator laws" meant to restrict free speech and protests during the dying days of Yanukovych’s regime, according to Chesno public movement.

But this is not the only issue that makes him a controversial figure.

Together with his brother, Andriy, Serhiy Klyuyev was put on the European Union sanction list as a ”subject to investigation in Ukraine for involvement in crimes in connection with the embezzlement of Ukrainian state funds and their illegal transfer outside Ukraine,” according to the EU Council regulation of March 5, 2014 which is available here http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/...01:0010:EN:PDF.

As a result, his and his brother’s bank accounts in Austria, where their renewable energy company Slav AG is registered, have been arrested. Serhiy Klyuyev confirmed that his Austrian account is blocked and said he’s trying to determine the reasons. No criminal cases against him have been launched in Ukraine or abroad, according to him.

Meanwhile, his brother Andriy faces several criminal investigations in Ukraine, the most serious of which is suspicion of involvement in organizing mass murders on Kyiv’s Independence Square during the EuroMaidan Revolution. He has been put on wanted list by the Security Service of Ukraine in February, when he reportedly left the country.

He also faces investigations on suspicion of financial crimes, including one involving a 150 million euro loan from the state-owned bank for financing pojects on solar batteries, according to the General Prosecutor’s Office.

Klyuyev brothers’ company Slav AG, reportedly, owns more than 70 companies in Ukraine, including Activ Solar, solar power station developer, owned and managed by Serhiy Klyuyev’s son-in-law Kaveh Ertefai. Serhiy Klyuyev has continuously denied having any connections with Activ Solar, while the company denied that Klyuyev brothers are its final beneficiaries.

There are 10 candidates, including Serhiy Klyuyev running in district 46.

Seven self-nominated candidates, Natalia Kidina from Serhiy Tigipko’s Strong Ukraine party, Andriy Loza from Svoboda party and no one from President Petro Poroshenko’s bloc, which remains the front-running party, according to recent polls. Serhiy Klyuyev won parliamentary elections in this district with more than 73 percent support of voters in 2012.

For more than 10 years, through his charity fund, he’s been giving money to meet the needs of schools, kindergartens, hospitals and providing loans to local businesses in his district, Serhiy Klyuyev said.

If re-elected, he wants to give more power to local governments, continue fighting corruption, attract investment for agriculture and industrial sphere, create more jobs on enterprises, support small and medium businesses, restore destroyed during military actions buildings and provide support for victims, among other plans, according to his agenda.

"My decision to run at early parliamentary elections was weighted and needful,” Serhiy Klyuyev said in the email to the Kyiv Post.. “Today we need to restore destroyed villages, roads, defend local entrepreneurs who have been working effectively. In need of state support are also internally displaced residents of Artemovsk, there are more than 10,000 of them,” he
Serhiy Klyuyev, brother of suspect in killings of EuroMaidan protesters, runs for parliament in Donetsk Oblast
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