Go Back   Ukraine.com Discussion Forum > Society > Politics

Notices


Ukrainian Parliament

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 29th September 2014, 21:30
Hannia Hannia is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 26,630
Hannia will become famous soon enough
Poroshenko Bloc, candidates tied to Yanukovych may dominate new parliament
Sept. 29, 2014, 3:03 p.m. | Oleg Sukhov

Ukraine’s next parliament, slated to be elected on Oct. 26, is likely to be anything but orderly.

Though it is expected to have a big share of President Petro Poroshenko’s supporters, it may be a radical, unstable and unpredictable legislature befitting the current revolutionary times. Some pundits even predict that it will be so dysfunctional that it will have to be dissolved next year.

Ukraine experienced a similar situation in 2007, when a parliament elected in the wake of the 2005 Orange Revolution was dissolved.

Although the next parliament may be more reflective of society, the key question is whether it will be able to overcome the populist tendency to promise more spending than recession-plagued Ukraine can deliver. It is also uncertain whether the new parliament will have a critical mass of lawmakers able to push through changes to liberalize the economy, strengthen democratic institutions, cut government deficits and curb corruption, among other reforms, especially if they prove unpopular with voters.

The next Rada is only likely to have 415 members or less out of the usual 450 because there will be no elections in the annexed Crimea and some parts of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts that are not controlled by the Ukrainian authorities.

Half of Ukraine's parliament is elected though party lists, which will be the same across the country. Another 213 deputies are scheduled be elected through single-member districts, where the set of candidates will be unique for each constituency. The number will still go down because the Central Election Commission is unlikely to be able to organize elections in some parts of Donbas.

The composition of the next Rada will be very different from the current one, according to Olga Aivazovska, head of Ukraine's biggest election watchdog Opora. She says at least 40 percent of the current lawmakers will be replaced. Sociologist Iryna Bekeshkina, head of the Democratic Initiatives Foundation, puts that figure at 60 percent.

The new Rada is likely to be more pro-European than the current one, while pro-Russian forces are expected to be an insignificant minority. “There will be no split regarding Russia,” Bekeshkina said.

Viktoria Siumar, a candidate on Prime Minister Arseniy Yatseniuk's People’s Front list and ex-deputy secretary of the National Security and Defense Council, said that at least 80 percent of the new parliament members are going to be pro-European.

Another difference is that it will include journalists, representatives of civil society and commanders of volunteer battalions who have appeared on the lists of most major parties who have a chance to cross the 5 percent threshold. “The parliament is ceasing to be a closed club for insiders,” Siumar said. “There will be no decision-making behind closed doors.”

She also said that the Rada was expected to include reform-minded EuroMaidan activists. But there will be plenty of people who have been a part of the system for a long time and have benefited from it.

A consultant of an opposition party who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the media, said that up to 180-200 deputies in the next parliament will be recycled lawmakers of Party of Regions, or close to former President Viktor Yanukovych's supporters such as Rinat Akhmetov and Serhiy Lyovochkin.

He said many of those deputies will be elected through single-member districts, while others have been planted into the party lists that have a chance to cross the parliamentary threshold, including the Poroshenko Bloc. The consultant even suggested that there might be an anti-Poroshenko coalition formed in the Rada next spring. Under the current constitution, the coalition gets to appoint most of the Cabinet in Ukraine.

Bekeshkina also sees the dangers of unsustainable populist polices and general instability.

“The next parliament will be much more radical and unstable and may be dissolved in a year,” political analyst Taras Berezovets said, adding that he doubted it would be able to carry out reforms.

Siumar said that major political crises were possible next year, and another snap election would be a good way out. If the next Rada manages to carry out constitutional and economic reforms, a snap election will also be a good way to reboot the political system, she added.

According to a poll conducted by the Democratic Initiatives Foundation on Sept. 12-21, 26.9 of those who are planning to vote will choose the Poroshenko Bloc, while Oleh Lyashko’s populist Radical Party was the runner-up with 6.2 percent and former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko’s Batkivshchyna got 5.5 percent.

Former Defense Minister Anatoliy Hrytsenko’s Civil Position, the People’s Front and the nationalist Svoboda party are expected to get 4.6 percent, 3.9 percent and 3.3 percent, respectively. Outsiders included the Communist Party with 3 percent, Kyiv Mayor Vitaly Klitshchko’s UDAR with 2.8 percent, former Deputy Prime Minister Sergiy Tigipko’s Strong Ukraine with 2.8 percent and Lviv Mayor Andriy Sadovy’s Samopomich with 1.7 percent.
UDAR will participate in the election as part of the Poroshenko Bloc.

Berezovets said that the Poroshenko Bloc was likely to control close to half of the next parliament.

The Poroshenko Bloc, formerly known as Solidarity, was set up in 2001 but had led a shadowy existence until early 2014, when Poroshenko launched his bid for the presidency. His party list has hoovered up activists and journalists, as well as other political hangers-on.

This party is expected to become the backbone of the next Cabinet, which is also likely to include representatives of other pro-European parties. The next Cabinet might theoretically include a mix of representatives of the Poroshenko Bloc, the People’s Front, the Civil Position, which is headed by former Defense Minister Anatoliy Hrytsenko, and Oleh Lyashko's Radical Party, Siumar said. If the People’s Front gets enough votes, Yatsenyuk might remain prime minister, she added.

Hrytsenko, leader of the Civil Position, told the Kyiv Post that the party would consider participating in the government coalition if the next Cabinet shared its ideas. Poroshenko Bloc, candidates tied to Yanukovych may dominate new parliament
__________________

æ, !

Hannia - Hania - Mighthelp
Reply With Quote
  #16 (permalink)  
Old 30th September 2014, 23:32
Hannia Hannia is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 26,630
Hannia will become famous soon enough
Ex-journalists fail to stop Khoroshkovsky from running for parliament
Sept. 30, 2014, 9:57 p.m. | Ian Bateson

Young journalists-turned-politicians lost a court case on Sep. 30 as they sought to challenge an official registration for an oligarch to run in the Oct. 26 parliamentary election.

The oligarch in question, former deputy Prime Minister Valeriy Khoroshkovsky, has lived in Monaco in the past few years. Under Ukraine's law, only Ukrainians who have lived in the country permanently for the past five years are allowed to run for parliament.

“It is clear the rule of law isn’t working in Ukraine,” said prominent journalist Serhiy Leshchenko, who is running in parliamentary election for the first time. “I am afraid some high ranking Ukrainian officials ordered to register Khoroshkovsky as part of an unofficial agreement with former regionals (Party of Regions members).”

Khoroshkovsky is one of Ukraine’s richest men. He recently returned home to run in the Oct. 26 parliamentary election on the party list for Sylna Ukraina headed by another mogul, ex-Deputy Prime Minister Sergiy Tigipko.

Khoroshkovsky made his fortune in the metallurgy and media sectors, among others. He served as deputy prime minister between February 2012 and December 2012 under now ousted President Viktor Yanukovych.

Former journalists running on the party list of Ukrainian President Petro Proshenko, Leshchenko and Mustafa Nayyem, filed a complaint to the Kyiv Appelate Administrative Court stating that Khoroshkovsky’s registration was in violations of the Ukrainian law.

Records from the Ukrainian border service provided by the plaintiffs showed that Khoroshkovsky left Ukraine in December 2012 after leaving office and did not return until September 2014.

However, journalist lost the case as the oligarch was allowed by court to run for parliament.

Khoroshkovsky did not attend the proceedings, but sent lawyers from the Kyiv Legal Company he owns to represent them. The registration documents presented to the Central Election Committee by Khoroshkovsky first stated he was unemployed before later stating he was employed by the Kyiv Legal Company and had been on a business trip abroad for the time in question.

Yaroslav Porokhnyak, one of the men representing Khoroshkovsky, said he had not seen the contradictory documents before that day.

Svetlana Chernyuk from the Central Election Committee’s legal department defended the Committee’s decision to approve Khoroshkovsky’s candidacy stating that his documents were in order.

After a long recess the three judges in the case ruled that the plaintiffs had failed to show that Khoroshkovsky’s election registration documents were not in order. Leshchenko and Nayyem vowed to appeal the decision.

“The decision shows you that to the state and (presidential) administration an oligarch matters more than journalists,” said their lawyer Tatyana Kozachenko. Ex-journalists fail to stop Khoroshkovsky from running for parliament
__________________

æ, !

Hannia - Hania - Mighthelp
Reply With Quote
  #17 (permalink)  
Old 1st October 2014, 17:37
Tkach Tkach is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 231
Tkach is on a distinguished road
Eventually, Ukrainians will realize it's futile to vote for any oligarchs and just wait for independent politicians or politician to be a candidate. From what I can tell, there's no one worth voting for right now.
Reply With Quote
  #18 (permalink)  
Old 2nd October 2014, 01:53
Hannia Hannia is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 26,630
Hannia will become famous soon enough
Tkach, not voting solves nothing !
__________________

æ, !

Hannia - Hania - Mighthelp
Reply With Quote
  #19 (permalink)  
Old 3rd October 2014, 02:17
Hannia Hannia is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 26,630
Hannia will become famous soon enough
Oct. 26 parliamentary election puts Ukraine's democracy to another test
Oct. 2, 2014, 10:13 p.m. | Anastasia Forina

Ukraine’s democracy is undergoing another stress test.

After successfully holding a presidential election on May 25 even as Russia occupied Crimea and was instigating war in the east, Ukraine will on Oct. 26 hold a snap parliamentary election. The vote will exclude millions of voters in war-torn Donbas and, of course, Crimea.

Mykhailo Okhendovsky, the Central Election Commission head, said on Sept.30 that elections may not be held in 10 out of 21 single-mandate districts in Donetsk Oblast and 7 out of 11 districts in Luhansk Oblast. Donetsk and Luhansk regions, before the war, were home to nearly 15 percent of Ukraine’s population, or more than 6.6 million people.

The off-limits districts are controlled by Kremlin-backed separatists or have become a battlefield between Ukrainian troops and the Russian proxies.

Combined with the 12 single-mandate districts in Crimea now under Russian control, the new parliament may be missing 29 representatives in the 450-seat body, meaning voters in areas with more than 5 million people will be disenfranchised, if the population of Crimea is included.

Half of Ukraine’s parliament is elected from party lists, the other half in single-mandate districts.
read in its entirety: Oct. 26 parliamentary election puts Ukraine's democracy to another test
__________________

æ, !

Hannia - Hania - Mighthelp
Reply With Quote
  #20 (permalink)  
Old 5th October 2014, 17:23
Hannia Hannia is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 26,630
Hannia will become famous soon enough
BBC: Brutal 'trash bucket challenges' spread in Ukraine (VIDEO)
Oct. 5, 2014, 6:56 p.m. | BBCUkraine crisis: Brutal 'trash bucket challenges' spread

As Ukraine prepares for parliamentary elections at the end of the month, a series of so-called "trash bucket challenges" are spreading across the country.

Activists, many from the far right, are throwing politicians whom they say are corrupt into rubbish bins.

Some of them have been brutal, and one official was also severely beaten. Critics have called the actions mob justice, and ask what this means for the rule of law in Ukraine in the future.
view video: BBC News - Ukraine crisis: Brutal 'trash bucket challenges' spread
__________________

æ, !

Hannia - Hania - Mighthelp
Reply With Quote
  #21 (permalink)  
Old 5th October 2014, 17:32
CleanSweep CleanSweep is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: UK/Europe
Posts: 37
CleanSweep is on a distinguished road
There's many British politicians I'd like to 'rubbish bin' (to use the English terminology).
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 21:21.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC4 © 2006, Crawlability, Inc.