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Chocolate, the story of our future?

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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 30th October 2011, 12:01
Gotno Gizmo Gotno Gizmo is offline
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Nestle are global, tha includes Ukraine

Quote:
Originally Posted by AkMike View Post
Has Nestles suddenly moved their corporate headquarters to Ukraine?
Although Nestle's corporate HQ is not in Ukraine, their international trading includes Ukraine. They are actively buying out national brands within these countries. Usually, but not always they place a smaller Nestle logo adjacent to local trade marked logo. The size of the trade marks/ logos are adjusted overtime, until the Nestle mark is predominant. Finally the local mark is removed and the product is then exclusively Nestle.
To confirm that Nestle are indeed well established in Ukraine see:
Головна | Nestlé Market
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 30th October 2011, 19:00
AkMike AkMike is offline
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I'm here now and I can easily see it my self.

Buying established business is just smart business. Corporate greed still works!
Don't you wish you had stock in the company?
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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 31st October 2011, 08:37
AkMike AkMike is offline
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It's still yummy Kathy!
In fact I'll wander out this afternoon and help enrich the coffers of this nasty exploiting mega corporation even though I don't hold any stock in it.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 1st November 2011, 21:31
Gotno Gizmo Gotno Gizmo is offline
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Kraft to open biscuit plant in Ukraine.

The Danone Group of France aquired the biscuit brands Lu, Oreo and Tuc for its European biscuit operations. This company later downsized closing six production sites in five countries. As part of a Europe-wide restructuring of its biscuit division 1,780 jobs were lost. The Danone biscuit Division was sold to the Uninted Kingdom's Jacob's Biscuit company who were part of the larger international United Biscuits conglomerate in 2004. Business articles identify United Biscuits as closing several production centres in Europe and shedding jobs over recent years. United Biscuits were aquired in 2006 by Blackstone Group and PAI Partners an Equity Holdings Cosortia with offices in New York and London. It was alledged that the consortia became indebted as a result of this aquisition and had to strip certain of these newly aquired assets in order to recapitalise. Although I lack the resources to identify the link, it is clear that the aforementioned biscuit brand names are now owned by Kraft Foods.
When I "Googled" these brands I turned up this news extract from the Financial Times
"US food giant Kraft Foods
has opened a biscuit R&D plant in France to make new products for brands including Lu, Oreo and Tuc. The EUR15m (US$20.6m) facility in the French town of Saclay will "support product development" for Kraft's biscuit brands and employ 120 staff. Kraft Foods says "France is an important market for biscuits in Europe and for Kraft Foods' snacking business globally. This investment makes good business sense, supporting us in our efforts to drive future biscuit innovation and growth". Kraft Foods Europe president Timothy Cofer said today (21 October). In 2011, Kraft's European biscuit business has been growing more than two times faster than the sector in Europe", the company said.
How remarkable that these brands should go on a mergers and aquisitions trail to end up back in France after 7 years. However this piece only refers to "support product development" and not production.

Now we come to the Ukrainian link which is so important to stop certain contributors of this forum from saying that my cited Global Oligarchial trade comments is not concerning Ukraine. Please see the Financial Times extract below:-
UKRAINE: Kraft to open biscuit plant
By:
Dean Best | 2 September 2011 Financial Times.

Kraft Foods is set to open a biscuit plant in Ukraine, one of the US food giant's ten "priority" emerging markets.
The Oreo maker is in the final stages of building the factory, which will be in the town of Trostaynets, in the north-west of the country. Kraft already has a chocolate plant and a coffee packaging facility in the town, a spokesman for the company's Ukraine unit said today (2 September).
The biscuit plant is expected to start producing Oreo, Tuc and Lu biscuits from December. Next year, the factory will manufacture 20,000 tons of biscuits and, over the next four years, output will double, the spokesman explained.
"The biscuits category in Ukraine is still in its formative years, with Kraft Foods having basically built this category from scratch," the spokesman told just-food. Over the last few years, the company has launched Oreo, Tuc and Lu and, this year, Kraft Foods reached number one in the biscuit category, moving up from fifth, with much further potential for growth."
Kraft has doubled the size of its business in Ukraine in the last three years and its sales stand at around US$500m, the spokesman added. The company is using Ukraine as a base to develop its business in 11 surrounding markets, including Belarus and markets further afield like Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan.
 
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 2nd November 2011, 06:58
AkMike AkMike is offline
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Good old American capitolism taking advantage of the downtrodden masses by filling a need and providing jobs.
Oh the horror of it all...

Just think.. the farmers have more markets for the grains, the mills can grind out more flour, the new plant will employ construction workers in a sagging economy. Then there will be more workers needing housing and since they'll have coin in their pockets maybe better housing also.
The government will get their slice of the pie and have some coin to improve the roads and other projects that are on the back burner.

Yes this is indeed sad news GG. ( NOT)
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Old 3rd November 2011, 13:37
Gotno Gizmo Gotno Gizmo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AkMike View Post
Good old American capitolism taking advantage of the downtrodden masses by filling a need and providing jobs.
Oh the horror of it all...

Just think.. the farmers have more markets for the grains, the mills can grind out more flour, the new plant will employ construction workers in a sagging economy.
Yes this is indeed sad news GG. ( NOT)
AkMike, I wish I could live in your “happy land” that promotes the gullibility that what is happening in Ukraine and elsewhere is something for the better. Based on the commercial practices of Kraft Foods and other mega corporation’s modus operandi, the following will occur in Ukraine.
Now that a modern highly efficient production plant that produces large volumes 24/7, with relatively small labour input pro rata to production is in place, the smaller biscuit producers will be “encouraged” to sell out. With cash and cooperation of “befriended” politicians many these traditional brands are then eliminated from the competition. These older and less efficient production plants are then closed with the loss of jobs in those areas. The power and influence of a huge television advertising budget, coupled with bulk deals to the supermarket conglomerates will ensure successful promotion of the replacement products.
If the high production yield of the new factory can be sold in the neighbouring countries as stated, and particularly if the production goes further west to earn additional Euros/Dollars, then certain of that new revenue will end up in the Ukraine coffers. However, global trading experience teaches us that this revenue does not filter back into the common mans pocket to anything like replace the deficit created by the loss of local jobs.
Regarding the good news for the food supplier’s comment; I believe you are in Ukraine at the moment. Go out into the countryside and observe the good agricultural terrain left out of production. I regularly see it as I travel through Ukraine. I am told that the cost of buying animal foodstuffs, crop seeds, pesticides, fertiliser, labour costs, irrigation, tractors and other agricultural equipment, plus the fuel to run them is now so costly pro rata to the end product prices that wholesalers/ supermarkets are prepared to pay, often the production is not viable. Food product prices are no longer determined by local market prices, but reflect the global market prices set by the commodity markets in places like New York and London.
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Old 3rd November 2011, 13:56
AkMike AkMike is offline
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After last weekends trip from Kyiv to Kaytrinopol I did see very large amounts of land not is use. The crops are ialready in and the and is ready for rest in the winter. There were still large amounts of corn/ maize in the fields but they were working at it. The storage bins had many trucks heavily loaded with grains just waiting to get in and unload.
Some fields were alrady planted with winter or red wheat. I personally saw no land that appeared to have lain fallow for any length of time. I did see a vast improvement in the farm equipment. There were many newer combines and tractors out. A large increase in American John Deere tractors also. (One of my favorites)
Many generations of my family were farmers in the US before my father's generation and I've spent many summers on the farm doing everything from hand milking to laying in the hay crops. This even included shoveling out the manure from the barns and calf pens.

Possibly your area is different? Here the farmlands are owned by the governmet or co-ops as I understand and the farmers have a small plot for their personal use.

I'll see more on Saturday as we go to Cherkassy and I see that Oblast. But I suspect I'll see the same thing, a sucessful bountiful harvest.
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