Go Back   Ukraine.com Discussion Forum > Society > Politics

Notices


President Victor Yanukovich Tracker

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Rate Thread Display Modes
  #22 (permalink)  
Old 21st July 2010, 19:54
Gotno Gizmo Gotno Gizmo is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,473
Gotno Gizmo is on a distinguished road
From The New York Times Website

Since Viktor F. Yanukovich was elected the Ukrainian president last February and his Party of Regions took power, journalists, local and foreign nongovernmental organizations and independent television channels have come under pressure from the security services.

Last month, the authorities withdrew the broadcasting license from the 5 Kanal television station. If the decision is upheld, one of the last independent stations will go off the air. Valery Khoroshkovsky, a media magnate and head of Ukraine’s security services, or S.B.U., is poised to take over the frequencies, a move that will increase even further the growing powers of the security services over the dissemination of news.

Mr. Yanukovich himself has proposed reintroducing “temnyky,” official guidelines for journalists. The abolition of the temnyky was one of the gains of the Orange Revolution. The pressure on the media has become so intense that the 2010 Press Freedom Index published by Freedom House ranked Ukraine 115th out of 195 countries, alongside Kuwait and Mexico.

More significantly, relations between Ukraine and the Russian leadership, which had opposed the Orange Revolution and which has always supported Mr. Yanukovich, have greatly improved.

President Dmitri A. Medvedev agreed last April to supply Ukraine with cheaper gas in return for Russia keeping its Black Sea Fleet in the Crimea until 2042. Susan Stewart, an expert on Russia at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs in Berlin, estimates that Ukraine will save up to $40 billion over the next 10 years.

Ukraine and Russia later signed an agreement restoring the right of Russia’s counterintelligence services to operate on the base of the Black Sea Fleet, giving them an official foothold in Ukraine. Ms. Stewart believes Russia’s policy toward Ukraine “is about re-establishing its hegemony in the region so as to become stronger vis-à-vis the West.” The Kremlin has resented Ukraine’s independence ever since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Despite using Mr. Yanukovich’s election as an opportunity to entrench itself in Ukraine, Russia has made limited inroads into Ukraine’s economy. Mr. Grätz argues that Ukraine’s oligarchs, who dominate most sectors of the economy, are prepared to challenge this aspect of Russia’s influence. They would lose out financially if Russian businesses took over the country’s energy resources and gas transit pipelines, which the Kremlin has long coveted.

This is where the E.U. could exercise some leverage. It is willing to offer Ukraine a free trade agreement provided the government embarks on major structural reforms. Such an accord would benefit some of the oligarchs; it would give them access to more markets and make their businesses more competitive.

Since Mr. Yanukovich says he is committed to bringing Ukraine closer to the E.U., Brussels should make any free trade negotiations conditional also on press freedom, an independent judiciary and the rule of law. “After all, these are the values of the E.U.,” said Mr. Lange. “We should use conditionality in a much more forceful and convincing way,” he added.

E.U. diplomats say they have repeatedly tried to do this with all the leaders since the Orange Revolution, but with little success. The aftermath of that revolution was dominated by infighting between its leaders, Viktor A. Yushchenko and Yulia V. Tymoshenko. They neglected economic and political reforms, failing to capitalize on their immense popular support and refusing to stamp out corruption. Ukraine is currently ranked 146th out of 180 countries in the annual Corruption Perception Index published by Transparency International.

“There is a massive sense of frustration in Brussels because no matter what the E.U. offers, it receives only empty promises by the Ukrainian authorities,” said Katinka Barysch, deputy director of the Center for European Reform in London.

When the E.U. offered recently to modernize Ukraine’s inefficient energy sector, there was enthusiasm by reformers but reluctance by the oligarchs. Modernization would mean transparency over supplies and prices, eroding the influence of the oligarchs. Russia also opposed the plan: it would make it more difficult to acquire parts of the energy sector.

No wonder then that Brussels is frustrated.

Nevertheless, the E.U., like Germany, is still too focused on Russia to really do something about Ukraine. Were Berlin to establish a separate strategy for Ukraine instead of always looking at the region through the prism of Russia, Europe might have a real chance in halting Ukraine’s slide away from democracy and into Russia’s sphere of influence.
Reply With Quote
  #23 (permalink)  
Old 28th July 2010, 14:44
Max_the_Highlander Max_the_Highlander is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 695
Max_the_Highlander is an unknown quantity at this point
Well guys I’m not in favor to publish large sophisticated articles here but thread is curious. I will make few own remarks. Actually it’s possible to formulate impressions from Yanukovich rule already.

First of all it seems he failed all his promises except two - about better relations with Russia and Ukraine’s neutrality. Relations with Russia got back to rather warm state and I think majority of Ukrainians considers this as relaxing. Exactly relaxing.

Few last years Yushchenko’s administration pushed Ukraine to extended conflict with Russia and only idiot or criminal would suggest we are in one weight category to fight. I bet they expected huge support from Washington and there was such support for real under GWB. But as everyone knows new administration betrayed Ukrainian democrats in favor of closer relations with Russia. This classic betrayal has happened right during the electoral season so we have what we have.

As for me neither among Ukrainian politicians will ever trust Uncle Sam as blindly as it was in orange days.

Now when the raw is finished everyone is breathing easier because it’s obvious we will not turn into Georgia Number 2. There are few other dangers but not screenplay of possible war.

Rejecting the NATO joining legally just put the point in idiotic game. NATO obviously expected Ukraine to work for and at the same time they didn’t give any promises or even hints actually they rejected officially our prospective memberships. Previous administration got into trap, NATO joining was one of electoral promises so they just simulated relations when in fact there were not relations at all.

Now when point is put it’s easier to breath for majority, once again. Frankly what interest ordinary Ukrainians may have in participating senseless massacres in Iraq and Afghanistan?

The rest of Yanukovich promises are broken or indefinite. There is certain political stabilization and certain economical progress. But gas and communal rates rise up, prices rise up, taxes for small and medium business are expected to rise up, arrears of wages rise up, social standards go down … There is no miracle as promised, for sure. To be objective legacy he’s got from Tymoshenko is pretty awful.

As for me these years are needed for younger politicians to get stronger, to get established more firmly. Because frankly Yushchenko, Tymoshenko and Yanukovich are just different sides of one coin. They all are so called “Kuchma kids” generation and they will stay them for the rest of life.
Reply With Quote
  #24 (permalink)  
Old 2nd August 2010, 12:59
Hannia Hannia is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Posts: 27,520
Hannia will become famous soon enough
Quote:
The rest of Yanukovich promises are broken or indefinite. There is certain political stabilization and certain economical progress. But gas and communal rates rise up, prices rise up, taxes for small and medium business are expected to rise up, arrears of wages rise up, social standards go down … There is no miracle as promised, for sure. To be objective legacy he’s got from Tymoshenko is pretty awful.

As for me these years are needed for younger politicians to get stronger, to get established more firmly. Because frankly Yushchenko, Tymoshenko and Yanukovich are just different sides of one coin. They all are so called “Kuchma kids” generation and they will stay them for the rest of life.
Maxym, very articulately put !!!


__________________

æ, !

Hannia - Hania - Mighthelp
Reply With Quote
  #25 (permalink)  
Old 2nd August 2010, 13:26
IreneLviv IreneLviv is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,160
IreneLviv is on a distinguished road
What 'certain" ecomic progress are you talking about? Economy is falling - same as ll the rest.
Reply With Quote
  #26 (permalink)  
Old 21st August 2010, 23:02
Gotno Gizmo Gotno Gizmo is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,473
Gotno Gizmo is on a distinguished road
Ukranian National Day - Monday 23 August

I am hearing stories about a poltically based national rally to take place next Monday throughout Ukraine.
Can someone enlighten me as to what it is about?
I believe that government workers are being "encouraged" to attend this rally on a day that should be a holiday.
It reminds me of previous experiences I had where workers were encouraged to attend such rallys in Romania back in the communist times and more recently in Kazakhstan. On these occasions the participants were required to carry banners proclaiming the virtues of the current government and their beloved President.
I hope these individuals will not be bearing banners on behalf of Yanukovich or his party, for if they are I shall begin to have fears for the future of Ukrainian democracy.

Last edited by Gotno Gizmo; 21st August 2010 at 23:04. Reason: typo error
Reply With Quote
  #27 (permalink)  
Old 3rd September 2010, 17:00
sjoyce sjoyce is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 253
sjoyce is on a distinguished road
According to the Kyiv Post, it appears the corruption "cleansing" has begun. The list of names and pictures show many of the members of Yulias political party. Many are probably "guilty as charged", however is this just another way of eliminating an opposition?
Reply With Quote
  #28 (permalink)  
Old 20th February 2011, 14:46
Gotno Gizmo Gotno Gizmo is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 1,473
Gotno Gizmo is on a distinguished road
Manipulation of the Media?

I picked up the following article on another website but cannot attribute it to a definite source or time, however I think it's an interesting read for Ukraine folloers:-

Kiev - Ukraine's leading independent television news channel will turn to the European Court for Human Rights to challenge a court ruling that blocks its expansion plans, the Interfax news agency reported Friday.
Kiev's regional administrative court ruled on Thursday that Channel 5 had improperly been awarded frequencies by a government agency to allow for its expansion.
The Kiev court decision could open the way for a new tender for the frequencies and give an advantage to Inter television, Channel 5's pro-government rival.
The ruling came in response to a suit brought by Inter. The Kiev court sided with Inter, finding that the previous government had acted improperly in instructing the National Television and Radio Committee to allocate more frequencies to Channel 5 than to Inter.
Inter, whose programming is almost always supportive of the government, broadcasts a mixture of entertainment, sports and news. Channel 5 is a news-only channel and Ukraine's only major television broadcaster that routinely criticizes the government.
Inter is owned by Valery Khoroshevsky, head of the SBU, the national intelligence agency.
He is a close ally of President Viktor Yanukovych. Both have denied they intend to suppress free speech or opposition access to the media.
Channel 5 said on its website that the court decision was unfair and dictated by the Yanukovych administration.
Inter television lawyers argued that their company enjoys a substantially larger market share than the news-oriented Channel 5 and should be awarded expanded frequencies for the operation of a new national movie channel.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 16:38.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC4 © 2006, Crawlability, Inc.