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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 20th March 2015, 01:39
Hannia Hannia is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AkMike View Post
Language doesn't define your nationality.
Mike, but it certainly defines your ethnicity. Starting with the Russian czars, Russia's aim was always to suppress ethnic language to the point of annihilation. In some cases, especially in the Far East, they did succeed.

I think NT makes a good argument, but his timing is way off. He expects the Ukrainian govt to act NOW on all issues that will need to be squared away in the near future. When Ukraine is fighting for its survival, language issues simply need to put on the back burner.
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 20th March 2015, 02:02
AkMike AkMike is offline
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That's very true Hannia, UA has many, many more important things to worry about first.

My point is that Ukrainians aren't concerned as much about the ethnic back round as what's in their soul for the future of UA.
Ukraine is a melting pot of many ethnic back rounds like all countries of the earth. My wife was born in Ukraine of Russian parents but she's UA all the way.!
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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 20th March 2015, 14:03
Hannia Hannia is offline
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Mike.

I understand that perfectly, as my lineage includes Vohlynian Ukrainian, Czech, Tartar, Halychanyn Ukrainian and one
GGrandmother, who was Polish. My Maternal Grandfather was fluent in German, as his very best friend was a Mennonite.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 23rd March 2015, 03:28
Pontius Pontius is offline
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Originally Posted by Neward Thelman View Post
What language do Poles speak, as their native language?
Polish, Kashubian and Silesian (considered by many as dialect, and by others as a separate language). Poles do not have problems with that. In the past, there was a dialect of Ukrainian language used on the Eastern parts of Poland, but nowadays is too much rare to even speak about it. However, no one had problems with that either.
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 23rd March 2015, 21:30
Neward Thelman Neward Thelman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pontius View Post
Polish, Kashubian and Silesian (considered by many as dialect, and by others as a separate language). Poles do not have problems with that. In the past, there was a dialect of Ukrainian language used on the Eastern parts of Poland, but nowadays is too much rare to even speak about it. However, no one had problems with that either.
Poland is different today, but it was hardly so in the past.

Ukrainian was suppressed. Indeed, after struggling against Polish deception and the most incredible underhandedness in the Austro-Hungarian Diet, Western Ukrainian was able to finally break free of Polish rule in the aftermath of WWI, which led to direct war with Poland in 1919. Ukraine lost. There followed another 2 decades of penurious Polish rule, suppressing anything resembling Ukrainian awareness. The slightest dissent resulted in arrest. A bit more dissent resulted in a death sentence.

A death sentence.

Polish was taught in schools from kindergarden thru the gynasium. Ukrainian was forbidden.

All you need to do is study the life of Stephan Bandera to see what life was like under Poland - and that's just for a few decades of the 20th century, not to mention what the Poles did for the other 650 years or so.

Here in the United States, I've known countless Polish persons. None of them - not one - will ever ever ever ever utter a single word in Ukrainian. Not once. Not ever. Other than English, they'll only speak to you in Polish, professing not to understand a syllable of Ukrainian. If a Ukrainian emegre engages a Pole in conversation here, it's in Polish.

But, this's no time to re-open old wounds with Poland, since we've got more than our hands full of a far greater and more fearsome enemy, which's threatening to overrun both countries.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 24th March 2015, 03:19
stepanstas stepanstas is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neward Thelman View Post
Here in the United States, I've known countless Polish persons. None of them - not one - will ever ever ever ever utter a single word in Ukrainian. Not once. Not ever. Other than English, they'll only speak to you in Polish, professing not to understand a syllable of Ukrainian. If a Ukrainian emegre engages a Pole in conversation here, it's in Polish.
Yes, it's quite annoying and makes you wonder what is happening. I'll have Polish people who barely speak English, speaking English to me because they can't speak Ukrainian. Even though when I speak Ukrainian back to them they say "ohh, you know some Polish".
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 28th March 2015, 13:36
Pontius Pontius is offline
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Neward Thelman, I know about the history, but you asked about languages in Poland - I referred only to this. We - mostly - do not have problems if someone speaks other language than ours. Obviously, there are morons who do have, but they are not taken seriously.

On the other hand, when (in the college) I had a Ukrainian girl in group, she was speaking Polish. She wanted to correct her phonetical mistakes, she wanted to make her accent more "Polish" as she was in Poland. I never did that, as I really liked that accent.

Ukrainian is quite understandable for someone, who is able to read cyrillic alphabet and is able to listen carefully. However, I don't know about Poles' behaviour abroad, but I've heard only, that they are quite annoying when using Polish language in a company of non-Polish speaking friend.
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