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Old 5th March 2010, 19:05
efc3011 efc3011 is offline
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Looking for Fedyna and Kasha families

I am looking for the Fedyna and Kasha families. My grandfather Teodor Fedyna came to America from Nowoszyce in 1902. I found a LDS record that says he was born in Dublany in 1874. Teodor reported his nationality as Galicia Austrian. Teodor's death certificate shows that his father's name was John, and his mother's maiden name was Anna Diaeznicki (spelling questionable).

My grandmother, Marya Kasha Fedyna came to America in 1905, reporting her last residence as Nowoszyce also. Mary reported herself to to Ruthenian, also born in 1874.
Mary's death certificate shows her father's name was Benj Kasha and her mother's was Catherine Martyn. Both are questionable, as the information came from a neighbor, and Catherine Martyn is the name of her daughter!

The only other information I have of Teodor is anecdotal. He told family members that he was in the military and rode a horse. He said he had some who shined his boots.

I would love to be able to find birth, marriage, and military records of my grandparents. And also, my great-grandparents!

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
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Old 6th March 2010, 08:37
Hannia Hannia is offline
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Hello efc.

Today there are 4 Fedyna still living in Novoshychi and another 9/10 in Dublyany.

In Ukraine there are appx 4,600 individuals carrying the Fedyna surname.

Some villagers have migrated to the larger cities for economic reasons and there are appx 35+ Fedyna living in Lviv today.

The Kasha surname is more limted. There are appx 300+ individuals carrying that surname in Ukraine, of which only two live in Lviv.
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There were quite a few emigrants from Novoshychi in appx 1900-1906. There had been some major flooding of the immedate area and all the food growing in the fields kept rotting. The village faced major famine for several yrs.

You should be able to track your family thru LDS Films back to 18th century.

This immediate area has some ancient settlements, for example, Novoshychi , a hamlet size village was founded in 1300. Today it still exists w/ a population of appx 430 souls.

Many villages in Sambir and Drohobych districts were/ are Bojko. This is a micro-ethnic Ruthenian/Ukrainian group.
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Your Grandafther was conscripted into the Austro-Hungarian military when he was 17 yrs. old. I doubt he was an officer. He may have had 3 yrs of education. You will probably be able to determine his miltary division and where he served , but individual records for foot soldiers are, for your purposes, pretty much non-existent. If there is an individual record, it is probably in a family attic in Chester

Did you know that Grandfather had $5.00 in his pocket upon arrival in America?

I need to organize the info that I found. Might take another day or so. Be patient.

Last edited by Hannia; 6th March 2010 at 08:53.
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Old 8th March 2010, 14:54
efc3011 efc3011 is offline
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Fedyna/Kasha Families

Hannia, I am amazed by your kindness! Wow! Looking up so much information for a total stranger! I am anxiously awaiting the further information you have access to. Thank you!
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Old 9th March 2010, 19:47
Hannia Hannia is offline
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Title
Metrical books, 1776-1920

Authors
Greek Catholic Church. Dublany (Łaka) (Main Author)

Notes
Microreproduction of original manuscripts at the Central State Historical Archives of Ukraine in L′viv.
Greek Catholic Church records (births, marriages, deaths) for Dublany (Łaka), Galizien, Austria; later Dublany (Sambor), Lwów, Poland; now Dubli︠a︡ny, Sambir, L′viv, Ukraine. Text in Latin with some headings in Russian.
Record group 201, series 4A, files 1780-1784, 6562-6563, 6565-6566, 6568-6569.
For some years the records of this locality are mixed with the records of other localities.

Subjects
Austria, Galizien, Dublany (Łąka) - Church records
Poland, Lwów, Dublany (Sambor) - Church records
, צ, ¦, - Φ
Ukraine, L′viv, Sambir, Dubli︠a︡ny - Church records

Format
Manuscript (On Film)

Language
Latin
Russian

Publication
Salt Lake City, Utah : Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1998-2003

Physical
on 4 microfilm reels ; 35 mm.

Film Notes
Note - Location [Film]
Volume 201-4A/1780 Births, marriages, deaths 1776-1800 (includes other localities) - FHL INTL Film [ 2125349 Item 4 ]
Volume 201-4A/1781 Births, marriages, deaths 1801-1820 -- Births 1815-1850 (includes birth index 1815-1850) (includes other localities) - FHL INTL Film [ 2125349 Item 5 ]
Volume 201-4A/1782 Births, marriages, deaths 1821-1836 (includes other localities) - FHL INTL Film [ 2125349 Item 6 ]
Volume 201-4A/1783 Births, marriages, deaths 1837-1838 (includes other localities) - FHL INTL Film [ 2125349 Item 7 ]
Volume 201-4A/1783 (cont.) Deaths 1838 -- Births, marriages, deaths 1839-1843 (includes other localities) - FHL INTL Film [ 2125350 Item 1 ]
Volume 201-4A/1784 Births, marriages, deaths 1844-1851 (includes other localities) - FHL INTL Film [ 2125350 Item 2 ]
Volume 201-4A/6562 Deaths 1920-1926 -- Births 1790-1865 -- Marriages 1795-1874 (some years missing) - FHL INTL Film [ 2377754 Item 5 ]
Volume 201-4A/6562 (cont.) Deaths 1787-1920 (some years missing) - FHL INTL Film [ 2377755 Item 1 ]
Volume 201-4A/6563 Births 1832-1860 -- Deaths 1831-1877 - FHL INTL Film [ 2377755 Item 2 ]
Volume 201-4A/6565 Births 1844-1868 - FHL INTL Film [ 2377755 Item 4 ]
Volume 201-4A/6566 Deaths 1844-1904 - FHL INTL Film [ 2377755 Item 5 ]
Volume 201-4A/6568 Births 1865-1879 - FHL INTL Film [ 2377755 Item 7 ]
Volume 201-4A/6569 Births 1868-1894 - FHL INTL Film [ 2377755 Item 8 ]
.
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Old 9th March 2010, 22:34
efc3011 efc3011 is offline
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Fedyna/Kasha Families

Would these be the records I could access through the Church of the Latter Day Saints?

Question: Could you please tell me what is the source of the information that says Fedyna might be a Boyko name? This is fascinating! I have heard that Fedyna might be Lemko. I don't know anything about either, and will have to do my homework.

Again, thank you!
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Old 9th March 2010, 22:50
Hannia Hannia is offline
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Teodore Fedyna/Fedena () was very likely called Fedko or Fedor by family and wife, Marya Kasha.

dob 1874 in Selo/village Dublyany

There is some indication that Fedko and Marya married late in a time frame when villagers married quite young. Don't be surprised to find that this may have been a second marriage for both??? Their first spouses may have died ??? In 1895, just in Dublyany alone, 40 families died of starvation.

OR it could also be that they just married late.

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From late 18th century to 1919 wies/village Dublyany was a large village with both a Greek Catholic and Roman Catholic Church. The filial Jewish Kahal was in Sambor. Sambor was the POWIAT (administrative district-county) and Laka was the GMINA (judicial/tax district)> Lemberg (Lwow) region > Historic Galicia (Halyczyna) Province, administered by ethnic Poles for the Austro-Hungarian Empire. During the Interwar Period (1919-1938) the region came under Reconstituted Poland's domain. Technically Poland had not existed as a geopolitical entity for the previous 125 yrs. Post WW2 this region became a part of SSR Ukraine, under Soviet domain, until 1991 when Ukraine became independent.

Today selo/village Dublyany ( ( in Ukrainian), first documented in 1432, still exists with a population of 2100+. To the west of the village, there is a very unique preserve of woodland. There are 300 and 400 yr old oaks still thriving among the many 100 yr young oaks. The international scientific community considers this a one of a kind.

http://atlas.mapquest.com/maps/print...YH49QrL3W6 lQ


In Ukrainian DUB means OAK. The village name means DWELLERS AMONG OAKS.

In Dublyany the first parish church was built in 1507. That was only 15 yrs after Columbus discovered America. In 1624 the church was burned during a Tartar attack on the village. Then a simple one was built again and then in 1860 the Church of the Epiphany of the Lord was constructed.. It remains an architectural landmark to this day.

This is where Grandfather Fedko (Teodore) was baptised within 10 days of his birth. In this time frame the METRYKA (Baptismal certificate) served as the birth certificate.

http://der-cer.lviv.ua/images/DSCN0976.JPG
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I provided you with info on LDS Film for Dublyany. If you have never researched these films before I encourage you to try your hand at it. Start by locating your nearest LDS Family Center. Order the film you would like to tackle. Rental is nominal. Bring a notebook, pens and a magnifying glass.

FamilySearch.org - Family History Centers


There is an exc HOW-TO tutorial on following: New Page 1

I would start w/grandfather's Metryka and a Matrimonial Certification.

If you find that it is too difficult , consider hiring a local in Ukraine, who will do the work for less than the archives normally charges. We have members here that could help you with that, if you like. After you are done with your family tree, consider contacting surviving family that may still be in the village. The researcher in Ukraine can also help you w/that. Also consider grabbing one of the kids in your family, and making a trip to Ukraine. Take a cotton bag with you. Bring some home soil back to your Immigrant/Ancestor's grave. There is a Ukrainian adage that says that for a Ukrainian soul eternal sleep is sweeter, when there is home soil for a pillow

Following is nothing more than a form of encouragement. These are Feduna still residing in Dublyany.

0 1980-06-18 7 0 23
Olga, daughter of Petro
0 1984-10-23 29 0 74
Olga, daughter of Bohdan
0 1982-02-24 29 0 74
Chrystyna, daughter of Bohdan
0 1927-05-16 29 0 73
Marya, daughter of Ivan
0 1961-11-01 29 0 74
Marya, daughter pf Myhajlo
0 1938-03-22 0 0
Mykola, son of Lyukyan
0 1973-05-29 26 0 0
Roman,son of Mykola
0 1959-01-07 29 0 74
Bohdan, son of Ivan
0 1922-08-05 29 0 73
Ivan, son of Myhajlo

Marya Kasha is next and I haven't forgotten that I still need to get you Austro-Hungarian Military link.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________

Last edited by Hannia; 10th March 2010 at 14:35.
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Old 10th March 2010, 05:20
Hannia Hannia is offline
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My GUESS is based on the locations where Bojko were once clustered in Ukraine and still live there today.

The Boyko'Boiko/Bojko are a distinctive group of Ukrainian Carpathian highlanders. The Boykos inhabited the central and the western half of the Carpathians in Ukraine. They can be found in the Dolyna and in part of the Rozhniativ districts > Ivano-Frankivska region, in Skoliv, in Turkiv and in parts of the Drohobych, Sambir and Starosambiri districts > Lviv region, and parts of the Mizhhirya district>Zakarpatska regiion.

Boykos identify themselves as part of the Ukrainian ethnos, although genetically the experts say they are distinct from other Ukrainians.

They are musical and artistic people.

The Boyko language is based on the Ruthenian language, much influenced by the Old Church Slavonic language used for liturgy. The name, Bojko/Boyjo, is thought by some to have originated as result of their distinct speech patterns.

Most Boykos belong to the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church, with a minority belonging to the Ukrainian Orthodox Church.

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As you progress in your research, you will determine if your Grandparents were indeed Bojko or not.

Last edited by Hannia; 10th March 2010 at 06:18.
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