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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 5th March 2015, 19:20
Hannia Hannia is offline
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NATO Official: Putin's Suppression to Blame for Nemtsov's Death
Reuters March 05, 2015 1:21 PM VOICE OF AMERICA

RIGA, LATVIA—

Vladimir Putin is seeking to turn Ukraine into a failed state while silencing dissent at home, a top NATO official said on Thursday, suggesting the Russian President was ultimately responsible for the murder of Kremlin critic Boris Nemtsov.

"President Putin's aim seems to be to turn Ukraine into a failed state and to suppress and discredit alternative voices in Russia," said NATO Deputy Secretary General Alexander Vershbow.

"We've seen that the victims are not just in eastern Ukraine, with the brutal murder of Boris Nemtsov last Friday," Vershbow told members of parliament from EU countries at a conference in Riga.

Putin said on Wednesday that the killing of Nemtsov, a former deputy prime minister who was shot dead last week, was a shameful tragedy. The Kremlin denies any involvement, saying that the killing was a "provocation" to discredit Putin.

"While we don't know who pulled the trigger, we do know that Boris Nemtsov was a powerful voice for democracy and against Russia's involvement in Ukraine ... [and] was among those vilified as "traitors" and "fifth columnists" in Russia's official propaganda," said Vershbow.

Since last summer, reports have been circulating inside the country that many serving Russian troops have died in combat in eastern Ukraine, where more than 5,600 people have been killed in a pro-Russian insurgency.

Moscow denies sending arms or troops to the region, saying any Russians fighting in Ukraine are volunteers.
NATO Official: Putin's Suppression to Blame for Nemtsov's Death
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Old 6th March 2015, 14:45
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The Daily Vertical: Navalny After Nemtsov
3/5/2015 Daily Vertical

Navalny will come out swinging after his release.

The Daily Vertical: Navalny After Nemtsov
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Old 7th March 2015, 14:56
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Two Detained in Nemtsov Murder Probe
VOICE OF AMERICA March 07, 2015 5:11 AM

Russia has detained two suspects for the murder of opposition leader Boris Nemtsov, the head of Russia's federal security Alexander Bortnikov told state television.

Bortnikov said Saturday the two men he identified as Anzor Gubashev and Zaur Dadayev were from the North Caucasus region, but he gave no other details.

It was not clear if either of the two suspects are accused of firing the shots that killed Nemtsov a little more than a week ago. Bortnikov said President Vladimir Putin has been told of the arrests.

At least one gunman shot Nemtsov four times late on Friday, February 27 while he and a female companion crossed a bridge over the Moscow River, just steps from the Kremlin. The woman was not hurt.

Nemtsov was to have led an anti-war and anti-Putin rally in Moscow that weekend. Instead, the rally was transformed into a tribute to Nemtsov whom U.S. President Barack Obama called a "tireless advocate" for the rights of the Russian people.

A few weeks before the shooting, Nemtsov told the Russian news website Sobesednik he thought Putin wanted him dead, and he did not hold back his contempt for the Russian leader.

"I'm afraid Putin will kill me. I believe that he was the one who unleashed the war in Ukraine. I couldn't dislike him more," Nemtsov said.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko condemned Nemtsov's murder, calling him a "bridge" between Ukraine and Russia.

President Obama called the killing "brutal" murder, and said Russia must carry out a prompt and impartial investigation.

French President Francois Hollande expressed anger at Nemtsov's death. He called the shooting a "hateful murder," and described Nemtsov as a "defender of democracy."

Nemtsov was a deputy prime minister in the 1990s, and many Russian observers predicted he would succeed then-President Boris Yeltsin.

After President Yeltsin chose Vladimir Putin as his successor, and Putin's subsequent election in 2000, Nemtsov became one of Russia's sharpest and most outspoken Putin critics, especially since last year's uprising in Ukraine.

In September, Nemtsov told VOA that Putin wants revenge for Ukraine's overthrow of its pro-Russian president.

He said Putin fears that what happened in Ukraine could happen in Russia, and sees a pro-European Ukraine as a threat to his own power. Two Detained in Nemtsov Murder Probe
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Sure, some Moslems from the Caucasus or one of the Stans did it...

Now one can only imagine what Putin's propaganda brigade will do w/this
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Last edited by Hannia; 7th March 2015 at 17:08.
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Old 7th March 2015, 17:15
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The Anti-Semitic Coding in Putin’s Telegram to Boris Nemtsov’s Mother
07.03.15 | Halya Coynash HUMAN RIGHTS IN UKRAINE

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s telegram to Boris Nemtsov’s mother was probably a good PR move. For those willing to believe that Putin was not involved in the latest of many killings of his critics over the last 15 years, it could have seemed like a noble gesture. The telegram, however, also had another message for the wider Russian audience, one with a bad Soviet smell to it. It was addressed to Dina Yakovlevna Eidman, although Nemtsov’s mother has not used her maiden name since she married 63 years ago, and all her documents are in the name of Nemtseva* According to Alfred Kokh who visited the family shortly after Nemtsov was gunned down near the Kremlin, Dina Yakovlevna is in no doubt why her maiden name was used, that being to stress that Nemtsov was “really Jewish”.

Putin was not alone in using Dina Yakovlevna’s maiden name. We can perhaps be kind and assume that the Russian media have used it because of its mention in an interview given on Feb 10 when Boris Nemtsov spoke of his mother’s – and his – fear that Putin might have him killed. In Putin’s case, there is quite simply no excuse. Nina Yakovlevna will have been under some degree of surveillance for decades: her correct surname was known.

It was done very cleverly. In the arsenal of grubby innuendo and irrelevant details about his companion used by the pro-Kremlin media to tarnish Nemtsov’s reputation, the standard Soviet technique of adding the ‘Jewish’ name in brackets would have been immediately slammed as anti-Semitic.

This, unfortunately, has been less the case with Ukrainian politics. Here it is the Kremlin-backed militants in eastern Ukraine and, often, the Russian media who speak of Ukraine’s democratically elected President Petro Poroshenko as “Poroshenko (Waltsman)”.

The ploy dates back to Soviet times. By ‘revealing’ a person’s ‘real name’, you can deny anti-Semitic motives and claim concern that the person in question is supposedly hiding something. On Twitter, Igor Strelkov (/ Girkin), ex-‘defence minister’ of the self-proclaimed ‘Donetsk people’s republic’ and identified by US officials as working for Russia’s GRU military intelligence service, wrote: “Why do they hide their real names? Poroshenko – Valtsman; Nemtsov – Eidman ….”

An article published by the ‘Novorossiya’ Central Information Service shortly before Poroshenko received a record absolute majority in the May 25 presidential elections begins by calling Poroshenko Jewish, then saying:

“There’s nothing bad in the fact that a Jew could become president, of course. For example, in Israel all leaders of the country are Jews and we see that they have a successful state. But why does Pyotr Valtsman conceal his nationality? Why does he declare himself a Ukrainian, and a Ukrainian nationalist at that? Why does he support anti-Semitic nationalists from Right Sector and other nationalist organizations?”

The far-right performed abysmally in the October 2014 parliamentary elections, with neither Right Sector nor VO Svoboda reaching the electoral threshold for entering parliament. Of the two individual Right Sector candidates elected as MPs, one – Boryslav Bereza – is Jewish. However, that is really by the way. Russian aggression and especially its virulent propaganda have had one very positive effect in Ukraine. With the country’s territorial integrity and sovereignty threatened, assumed divides on ethnic grounds have rightly been minimized.

The same cannot be said of the Kremlin-backed militants in eastern Ukraine, nor of the pro-Kremlin media.

There was outcry in both Ukraine and abroad after the leaders of the so-called Donetsk and Luhansk ‘people’s republics’ were broadcast on Russian television dismissing Ukraine’s new leaders as ‘pathetic Jews’. The western media who then copy-pasted phrases used on multiple occasions about ‘widespread anti-Semitic sentiments” in Ukraine missed the point entirely. A quick Google check would have illuminated the situation very clearly. A year ago Putin tried to justify Russia’s aggression against Ukraine by claiming that ‘fascist anti-Semitic hordes’ had seized power in Kyiv. His proxies in Donbas clearly have a different view on the matter. So too do his advisers and the Russian propaganda machine which are dredging out Soviet tactics in their presentation of critics of their aggression, like Boris Nemtsov.
The Anti-Semitic Coding in Putins Telegram to Boris Nemtsovs Mother :: khpg.org
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Old 9th March 2015, 02:49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Szary View Post
Hannia, in no way did I ever attempt to dishonor Nemtsov or as you suggest ‘subtly threaten’ you. I simply added my own opinion together with a link to a Canadian website that proposed various theories regarding Nemtsov’s brutal murder. This is after all a forum for discussion.

It was YOUR choice to immediately launch into personal attacks which detracts from Nemtsov’s memory and from this thread. It was YOUR choice to go there. In response I merely suggested you were sorely mistaken and in passing added a link I had just seen on YouTube’s front page of the type of nutty Russian extremists that you so dislike. In no way did I say I supported them, on the contrary it should be quite obvious that few could.

Nor did I ever suggest I ‘hate’ Obama. That does not mean that I agree with his weak feeble policies… for example I strongly disagree with him for dragging his feet on providing arms to Ukraine, instead giving them fluffy empty promises. Romney, who I voted for, would have no doubt fully armed Ukraine and stood up to Putin.
Response to imperialist video “I am a Russian occupant” challenges Kremlin’s selective history
Alya Shandra 2015/03/09 • Analysis & Opinion EURPMAIDAN PRESS

On 27 February 2015, a video published by the Russian blogger Evgeny Zhurov called “I am a Russian occupant” started making rounds in the internet. The sophisticated propaganda video justified Russia’s many invasions into its neighboring territories by Russia’s purported inputs into the countries’ development, while turning a blind eye to the numerous atrocities that the same invasion had resulted in. Vasyl Samokhvalov, the co-owner of the company PlusOne DA, which is one of the co-founders of the Ukrainian Crisis Media Center, published a response that has challenged the Russian imperial narrative. “The goal was in a couple of hours to produce a free rebuttal to a well-produced expensive Russian propaganda clip. In 10 minutes, I jotted down a response based on the motives of the Russian video,” he commented.

“It was I who invaded blossoming Afghanistan. I was asked to leave and I left, leaving in my wake the most dangerous hotspot on the planet, where weapons, violence, and drugs reign,” the Ukrainian video mocks the words of the “Russian occupant” which offer some imperialist apologetics for Russian expansion into the Baltic states, Siberia, Central Asia, Ukraine, justifying it by “oil, gas, aluminum and other useful stuff” produced in Siberia, aircraft engines in Ukraine, electronic goods in the Baltic States, cosmodromes in Central Asia. The omitted unsuccessful Soviet invasion of Afghanistan was not so rosy. Attempting to shore up the newly-established pro-Soviet regime, the Soviet army unleashed a brutal conflict that killed one million civilians, as well as 90,000 Mujahideen fighters, 18,000 Afghan troops, and 14,500 Soviet soldiers. Afghanistan reaps the consequences of this invasion to the present day.

“It was I who occupied Finland. I was asked to leave and today Finns make telephones, clothing, and products, the analogues of which we do not have,” continues the video, challenging the imperial Russian occupant’s claims that the withdrawal of Russians from the territories they occupied brings economic devastation. The Soviet invasion of Finland over 1939-40 generated a phenomenal partisan resistance that repelled the invasion at the cost of 25 000 Finns to 200 000 Soviets. Finland lost 10% of its territory to Russia.

The Soviet invasion of Poland is remembered too. “It was I who sliced up Poland and occupied Warsaw. I was asked to leave, and today an average Pole is 4 times wealthier than an average Russian”: the Soviet military operation that started in 1939 resulted in the two-way division and annexation of the entire Second Polish Republic by Germany and the Soviet Union. “It was I who annexed Sakhalin and the Kuril islands from Japan, and to this day people survive there by fishing and subsistence farming, while neighboring Japan lives by the technologies of the future,” continues the video in its relentless economical attack. Having taken over the Soviet “brand” after the demise of the Soviet Union, Putin places considerable efforts in fostering USSR-nostalgia, which is widespread both in Russia and Ukraine. Remembering, or rather, creating the illusion of a “glorious” Soviet past is part of the Kremlin’s strategy to distract the Russian population from Russia’s current economic isolation and social problems, and to create positive sentiments for a “strong ruler” and military expansion into neighboring territories.

“It was I who organized Holodomor in Ukraine, when millions of people died due to hunger and forced starvation,” the video brings up the genocidal famine organized by Stalin that Kremlin apologists consistently deny. Other episodes that are not often mentioned in modern-day Russia follow suit: “It was I who became an ally of Hitler and unleashed the Second World War. It was I who drowned Budapest in blood in 1956, Prague in 1968, Tbilisi in 1989, Vilnius in 1991. It was I who built Gulag camps and persecuted dissidents.” Inconvenient truths for the Soviet brand on the Russian domestic market, to the point of shutting down the only Gulag museum in the country which had been illuminating Soviet-era political repressions. The museum may reopen, but as a memorial to the Gulag system, and is to bear no references to Stalin’s crimes. According to the latest Levada poll, 52% of Russians view Stalin positively. Growing positive sentiment for the repressive Soviet dictator is crucial for Putin’s regime to maintain the high levels of support it enjoys now (86% of Russians support Putin’s policies), as the analogies between the two policies are all too numerous. Response to imperialist video "I am a Russian occupant" challenges Kremlin's selective history -Euromaidan Press |
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 9th March 2015, 12:53
Tkach Tkach is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Szary View Post
My dear Hannia, I haven’t been on vacation, you can probably guess that I had been recalled to the Kremlin to receive my latest instructions on how to undermine the Ukrainian forum. My gosh, you probably think I’m not joking when I say that. The moderators can no doubt see my California IP address, but then maybe the Kremlin planted me here, right?

Honestly Hannia, I just haven’t had much to say since 95% of the postings on this forum are simply you reposting mainstream and only mainstream news easily seen anywhere. Which would be okay if you sometimes included some insightful discussion or opinions. In contrast, someone like stepanstas has swayed my opinion more than once with his knowledge and statements.

So getting back to business, in your view is the Canadian news website in my previous post Russian propaganda? Do you truly think that the KGB/FSB is so unsophisticated in accomplishing their missions as to simply gun people down like the old time Mafia? But then why am I asking, you unfortunately never offer insight, you only launch personal attacks against any who question. Peace.
Szary, I'm familiar with that website. Do you know it's a Canadian-based ultra-left Marxist site - and therefore, supports Russia in everything - given Russia's USSR history and currrent situation as neo-Soviet (with neo-commie) elements?

They spin all their articles from that centric view. Just so you know.

I'm not sure why it (i.e. the killing) couldn't be backed by Putin in some sort of intended false flag event. Many in Russia are already open to such conspiracies - and believe it was orchestrated by the West, to create Nemtsov as some sort of martyr and building block towards increasing criticism towards Putin.

If you look at the overall populace in Russia, so many still don't think Putin was involved and that is all that matters for Putin - what the citizens think.

The authorities already grabbed some so-called suspects - wouldn't any suspects be already gone if the West had arranged this assassination. It doesn't make sense that they would have the perpetrators still hanging around in Russia. If Putin did it, it would make sense for him to arrange some scapegoat and manufacture some other reason for the killing. Of course, I'm just specultating.

I think the only reason for Putin to be involved is to send a message to critics - as a warning of what can happen if you overstep. So, it just depends if you think that theory is credibile or not. I'm not saying, 100% it was Putin but I think it's quite possible.

If the economy continues to decline and the situation in Russia becomes worse, there might be A) more critics or B) the citizens might be more open to what the critics have to say - as they try to find a solution.
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Old 9th March 2015, 15:58
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Nemtsov Ally Skeptical Of Russian Arrests
RADIO FREE EUROPE Last updated (GMT/UTC): 09.03.2015 AFP & REUTERS

An ally of slain Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov has dismissed the official version of the inquiry into the killing as “more than absurd.”

Ilya Yashin, a co-leader of Nemtsov's political party RPR-Parnas, told the AFP news agency on March 9 that, "In my opinion, it is the result of a political order from the Kremlin."

"Our worst fears are coming true,” he added. “The hitman has been arrested but the commander will remain free."

Yashin earlier said on Twitter, "Investigators' nonsensical theory about Islamist motives in Nemtsov's killing suit the Kremlin and take [President Vladimir] Putin out of the firing line."

Nemtsov, a longtime critic of Putin, was shot four times in the back late on February 27 as he walked with his girlfriend along a bridge just meters from the Kremlin, sending shockwaves through the country's opposition and prompting an outpouring of international condemnation.

A Moscow court on March 8 ordered five suspects -- all from Russia's volatile North Caucasus -- held in custody until April 28.

Two of them, both of Chechen origin -- Anzor Gubashev and Zaur Dadayev -- were charged with involvement in the shooting.

The three other suspects include Gubashev's brother, Shagid, Ramzan Bakhayev, and Tamerlan Eskerkhanov.

Bakhayev and Esterkhanov are reportedly related to Dadayev.

Officials said Dadayev and the two Gubashevs were arrested in Ingushetia on March 7 and the other two in suburban Moscow early on March 8.

A sixth man was reported to have killed himself during a standoff with police late on March 7 in the Chechen capital, Grozny.

The court said Dadayev, one of the men charged, admitted involvement.

On his Instagram account on March 8, Kadyrov said he had been an officer in an Interior Ministry unit in Chechnya.

He also defended Dadayev, saying he is "a true Russian patriot" and a pious Muslim who was shocked by cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

Nemtsov had condemned the deadly January attack by Islamist gunmen on the Paris office of Charlie Hebdo.

Investigators have suggested that Nemtsov’s killers wanted to destabilize Russia, which is facing its worst standoff with the West since the Cold War over Ukraine.

But they were also probing the possibility he was assassinated for criticizing Russia's role in the Ukraine conflict or his condemnation of the Charlie Hebdo attack.

Russia's Investigative Committee said it had evidence that Nemtsov had received threats "in connection with his position" on the Paris attack.

But Yashin told AFP that Nemtsov had "never spoken negatively about Islam" and had merely criticized the Islamist militants who gunned down 12 people at the French weekly’s offices.

Also on March 9, an official website published a decree signed by Putin granting Kadyrov a high state medal.

Kadyrov, among other Russian officials and celebrities, was awarded the Order Of Honor for "professional achievements, public activities, and many years of diligent work."

Putin has relied on Kadyrov to maintain control over Chechnya, where rights activists accuse him of condoning abuses and creating a climate of fear to keep an Islamist insurgency and separatism in check.

On January 19, hundreds of thousands of people joined an official rally in Grozny against the cartoons.

Addressing the crowd, Kadyrov criticized Western governments for allowing other media to reprint the caricatures.

Also in January, Nemtsov accused Kadyrov of violating Russia's criminal code by infringing journalists' activities.

"Everybody is already sick and tired of Ramzan's threats, but he is certain that Putin will not let anyone touch him, so he is growing increasingly brazen every day," he wrote on Facebook.Nemtsov Ally Skeptical Of Russian Arrests
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